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You don't have to be a vegan to drool over these pictures from 15 of the best vegetarian spots.

These are the 15 best new vegetarian restaurants across America, according to Foursquare users.

You don't have to be a vegan to drool over these pictures from 15 of the best vegetarian spots.

October is Vegetarian Awareness month! So be aware that vegetarianism is a thing, and many think it's a very good thing, and there are restaurants popping up everywhere with delicious options. Foursquare rounded up all the best new vegetarian or vegan restaurants that have opened within the previous year. Dig in!

1. by CHLOE

185 Bleecker St. (at MacDougal St.), New York City


Grub type: American, cafe style

All images via Foursquare, used with permission.

Rating: With a 9.3/10 average rating, by CHLOE is the top pick in the country for vegetarian goodies.

Sample review:

"Everyone said the salads were amazing & I thought they were crazy, I got one & now I say the same thing. Mac & cheese is phenom. Get the espresso cookie!!!"

2. Beyond Sushi

62 W. 56th St. (Sixth Ave.), New York City

Grub type: The name says it all!

Rating: 9.2/10

Sample review:

"Combo 3 with the Spicy Mango Roll and the Nutty Buddy wrap is my favorite lunch in midtown."

3. Amy's Drive-Thru

58 Golf Course Drive W, Rohnert Park, California

Check it out — Upworthy featured this one before!

Grub type: American quick-fix foodstuffs

Rating: 8.8/10

Sample review:

"Had the chili cheese fries and loved it! Also tried the broccoli Mac & cheese and it was yummy too!"

4. Cafe Gratitude Arts District

300 S. Santa Fe Ave., Suite A (at E. Third St.), Los Angeles

Grub type: Artsy,"hippie" fresh fare


Rating: 8.6/10

Sample review:

"They will have some more hippie and feel-good organic dish names on their new menu (just add 'I am' before each name) like their 'Abundant,' which is an antipasto appetizer plate with cultured macadamia cheese with white truffle; 'Dynamic,' a garnet yam and cauliflower samosas appetizer; and 'Bountiful' dinner dish, a gluten-free quinoa pasta sauteed with braised cauliflower, kale and cashew cream sauce. They'll also have a raw enchiladas dish made with a pumpkin seed and walnut chorizo encased in a spinach tortilla, which reminds us of something we'd find at Gracias Madre, their vegan-based Mexican restaurant in West Hollywood." — LAist

5. Veggie Grill

1320 Locust St., Walnut Creek, California

Grub type: Diner-type standbys like burgers and tacos

Rating: 8.6/10

Sample review:

"As a meat eater, I can attest to the fact that the 'chicken' here tastes pretty close to chicken. Delicious for both carnivores and herbivores."

6. VegeNation

616 E. Carson Ave., Suite 120, Las Vegas

Grub type: Runs the gamut, breakfast or lunch, meatball grinders to Mexican hummus to sushi

Rating: 8.8/10

Sample review:

"Wow. A gem in the heart of downtown Vegas. Charming interior and delicious vegan and vegetarian breakfast and lunch."

7. Native Foods Cafe

1216 W. Broad St., Falls Church, Virginia

Grub type: Family-friendly, casual, with wraps and quick bites

Rating: 8.2/10

Sample review:

"When you don't want to choose between chicken ranch sandwich and avocado crunch wrap, get the twister wrap. They'll give you extra sauces on the side if you can't decide between Ranch and Chipotle :-D"

8. Toad Style

93 Ralph Ave., Brooklyn

Grub type: Creative, eclectic starters and sandwiches

Rating: 8.2/10

Sample review:

"If you want my bahn mi and you think I'm sexy, come on honey tell me so."

9. Golden Era Vegan

395 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco

Grub type: Asian-inspired dishes like spring rolls, pho, and lemongrass tofu

Rating: 8.3/10

Sample review:

"We had spring rolls and lemongrass (fake) chicken. Both were tasty!"

10. Millennium

5912 College Ave., Oakland, California

Grub type: Pretty plates, large portions, with an Eastern twist

Rating: 8.2/10

Sample review:

"Yes, it's all vegan. And tasty. Burmese red-lentil curry is creamy, hearty. Stiff cocktails like a Redwood Martini w/ redwood tips and Millennium Manhattan w/ infused rye (in large jars at the bar)."

11. Superiority Burger

430 E. Ninth St. (between First Ave. and Ave. A), New York City

Grub type: Burgers and fried potatoes — classic Americana

Rating: 8.1/10

Sample review:

"Order the entire menu with a friend, eat it outside, and come back in for the desserts. Also, don't follow your (usually correct) instinct to avoid the 'wrap': it's the best stand-by dish they have."

12. Choices Cafe

2626 Ponce De Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, Florida

Grub type: Quick-serve wraps and juices

Rating: 7.6/10

Sample review:

"Delicious wraps, bowls, cookies and fresh juices!"

13. V Street

126 S. 19th St. (between Sansom and Walnut streets), Philadelphia

Grub type: Runs the multicultural spectrum, like Peruvian and Indian dishes, and the menu changes often

Rating: 8.1/10

Sample review:

"Best pure vegan restaurant I've ever been to. I'm generally a bit too carnivorous to venture this way, but I was blown away by how much I enjoyed their dishes. The papas criollas were excellent."

14. La Botanica

2911 N. Saint Mary's St., San Antonio, Texas

Grub type: Mexican-style deliciousness

Rating: 7.7/10

Sample review:

"Had the corn and nopal tacos. Pretty badass."

15. Wayward Vegan Cafe

801 NE 65th St., Seattle

Grub type: Brunch, lunch, and dinner, varying from pancakes to salads

Rating: 7.7/10

Sample review:

"Everything is great, but their burger selection and biscuits and gravy really stand out. Get the Biscuit Mountain."

If any of these are in your area, hit them up, and give the vegetarian life a shot. You may find some really delicious alternatives, if nothing else!

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