Why people are dedicating their votes to powerful women past, present, and future.

People have already turned out to vote in the 2016 election in record numbers, and many are hoping their efforts will elect the first female president of the United States.

Those who were alive when women didn't even have the right to vote are proudly casting their ballots in the name of busting through yet another glass ceiling.

It's inspiring that tons of people are coming out to vote. But what's even more inspiring is how many are dedicating their vote to women who've touched their lives on a more personal level.  

People took to Twitter using #DedicateYourVoteToAWoman to share their dedications.


Some shouted out their grandmothers whose perseverance they always admired. Others mentioned their daughters for whom they hope their vote will help realize a better future.

Here are 11 incredible examples of people sharing why their vote means so much for progress.

1. This godmother dedicated her vote to her super goddaughter.

2. This husband dedicated his vote to a woman he loves and admires (his wife ... duh).

3. This person voted in honor of a woman who burst through another glass ceiling — Shirley Chisholm, the first African-American woman to be elected to Congress.

4. And here's an incredible dedication to a badass grandma and nana.

5. This daughter lost her mother six years ago. She thought voting for another woman who never quits was a fitting homage.

6. This man dedicated his vote to the millions of women in Saudi Arabia who need support now more than ever.

7. And this woman who followed that up by giving hers to a woman in Haiti who lost everything.

8. This woman cast her ballot for all the undocumented mothers who fear a Trump presidency more than most.

9. With this election rife with incidents of sexual assault, this woman dedicate her vote to all women suffering (often in silence).

10. This dedication is for the women whose progress was thwarted by a misogynistic world.

11. And finally, a dedication to all the women who sacrificed themselves so that we can have this privilege today.

A woman in the White House would mean we've made significant progress in the name of equality.

This win for progress is captured most succinctly in these posts.

If one woman can take the most powerful seat in the country, it paves a much smoother path for all women — past, present, and future — to break through our own glass ceilings.

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