We share everything on social media. Why not use your social power to make a difference?
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Johnson & Johnson Caring Crowd

We share so much happiness on social media.

Photo courtesy of CaringCrowd.

Whether it's a birthday, a wedding, or a graduation, we've always got the camera ready to shoot pics and video for an epic Snapchat or Instagram story. We like, comment on and share the successes of others. And we love to share what matters most to us.


That's just how we're wired. Research even suggests that sharing our best moments gives our brain a hit of the "good feeling" chemical, dopamine.  It makes us feel closer to our loved ones, even when we can't be there for their happiest times in person.

Now imagine what we could achieve if we harnessed all that good energy and used it to regularly share posts on the social good projects we care about.

Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash.

As we've seen time and time again, Facebook and Twitter aren't just sites for sharing memories — they're also a great way to get information out about the causes we believe in. What's more, we can use our social feeds to let our friends, families and co-workers know how they can support those causes, too.

That's why Johnson & Johnson created CaringCrowd®. It's a new type of crowdfunding platform, where your passion fuels projects that are integral to promoting human health. All you have to do is choose a project that speaks to you, make a pledge to help it reach its funding goal, and share your support on social media. Pretty easy, right?

In a world where crowds and unity have power, CaringCrowd empowers you and everyone you know to make a difference, together. The platform is enabling people to take on everything from the  clean water crisis to mental health stigma.

When you pledge and share, you're not just giving money, you're driving awareness throughout your entire network. Showing that you care can create a small ripple of engagement that can turn into a whole movement.

And that's not just a theory. The power of the crowd has already achieved so much.

Photo courtesy of CaringCrowd.

CaringCrowd is working on a multitude of projects that can change the world.  Through pledging and sharing, the platform has made it possible for mothers and grandmothers in Malawi to get the resources they need to raise healthy children. Supporters are working to raise stroke awareness and promote rehabilitation for survivors and their families at The Rocky Mountain Stroke Center. And pledgers are helping Inspire Inc create new workshops that will help 200 foster youth and their families learn how to cope with stress and hard times.

All of these projects were created by people who want to affect positive change and ease suffering. They were created by people who care and aren't afraid to show it. They were created by people exactly like you.

Now it's your turn to show the world the issues you care about.

Photo courtesy of CaringCrowd.

While anyone can submit a project on CaringCrowd, they are taking it one step further.  If you submit a one-minute video sharing who you are, what health issue you care about, and why we need to take action now on the site before December 31st, you'll be entered into a competition in which the top three entries will be judged by the crowd at SXSW. The winning clip will be turned into a professionally produced video for CaringCrowd.

You have the power to make the world a better place right now. It starts with your passion, and ends with your ability to rally people behind it.

For more on CaringCrowd and the competition, check out the video below:

What global health cause do you care about?

In our connected world, the power of the crowd can spread a message, create change, and make a difference.

Posted by Upworthy on Wednesday, November 21, 2018
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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