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Health

Doctor shows the bizarre toilet position that can help with constipation

It's weird, but it works.

constipation, constipation remedies, best position for pooping, health
@sadovskaya_doctor/TikTok, Canva

It just might be crazy enough to work

Around 4 million people in the United States suffer from frequent constipation (according to John Hopkins) resulting in 2.5 million doctor visits per year. In fact, constipation is the number one most common gastrointestinal complaint.

Constipation can actually be a complex issue to navigate because it can have a variety of causes, both big and small—a lack of fluids of fiber, reactions to medications, stress, abuse of laxatives. Even a sudden change in environment can trigger it. Ever suddenly have trouble going to the bathroom when you're traveling? You’re not alone.

Our position on the toilet can also greatly affect whether or not we have a healthy bowel movement. And while you may have never attempted this unconventional configuration, one doctor swears it’s number one for number twos.

Daria Sadovskaya, 29, a nephrologist based in Singapore, often shares lesser-known health tips and common hygiene mistakes on TikTok.

Previously, Sadovskaya went viral after sharing why you should never use a loofah, keep a razor in the bathroom, or keep your hair down while using the toilet. (yes, really)

Now, the kidney expert has revealed a position guaranteed to “help you to poop fast.”

In the video, which has already been viewed 26 million times, Sadovskaya sits on the toilet doing a move that looks like it belongs in a yoga class—her left leg crossed over her lap, her foot on her right thigh.

Then she looks to the left, twisting her whole upper body in that direction. Kind of seems like even if this position doesn’t work, at least you’d get a good stretch out of it.

@sadovskaya_doctor What to do if you’re constipated and can’t poop? Try this position, it will help you to poop fast. #healthypooping #poopfast #constipationhelp ♬ original sound - Jazzzz

It might look bizarre, but Sadovskaya assures it’s an effective remedy against light constipation. “This hack works like a kind of self-massage, helping the stool to come out faster and easier,” she told NeedToKnow.co.uk, also suggesting regular exercise, plenty of fiber and water and avoiding caffeine and alcohol.

What’s more, Sadovskaya warned that an incorrect toilet position could lead to bigger problems, and should be taken seriously.

“Constipation is an issue itself but it [using the wrong position] can also lead to hemorrhoids, anal fissures, urinary problems, even increases the risks of colorectal cancer. In addition to all of the above, it can cause nutritional deficiencies, bowel dysfunction and even psychological issues,” she said.

In addition to going mega viral, Sadovskaya’s video received thousands of comments from viewers saying the trick worked–though it’s hard to say whether they were being sincere or saying it in jest.

“I’m pooping rn and it worked bless ur soul,” someone wrote.

“I’m on the toilet rn and it’s lowkey working LMAOOO,” another said.

As weird as it might seem, it’s not like this is the first time unique pooping positions have found their way to legitimacy. Once upon a time, squatting seemed like something totally foreign (at least to Western societies). Now, millions own a Squatty Potty.

And sure, there’s plenty of pseudoscience out there, so we should all use a healthy dose of discernment when it comes to medical advice—especially in today’s digital age. But it’s also true that odd remedies do exist. So there’s no harm in trying, at least in this case. Who knows? Maybe your body will thank you for it.

And if you’re still on the fence, your could also try these more traditional options from Health.com:

  • Going to the bathroom at the same time each day
  • Going to the bathroom as soon as you need to, and never holding in a bowel movement
  • Trying to poop about 15-45 minutes after breakfast or lunch
  • Drinking coffee
  • Exercising regularly
  • Taking magnesium supplements
  • Taking over-the-counter (OTC) stool softeners or stimulant laxatives, if necessary

Identity

Celebrate International Women's Day with these stunning photos of female leaders changing the world

The portraits, taken by acclaimed photographer Nigel Barker, are part of CARE's "She Leads the World" campaign.

Images provided by CARE

Kadiatu (left), Zainab (right)

True

Women are breaking down barriers every day. They are transforming the world into a more equitable place with every scientific discovery, athletic feat, social justice reform, artistic endeavor, leadership role, and community outreach project.

And while these breakthroughs are happening all the time, International Women’s Day (Mar 8) is when we can all take time to acknowledge the collective progress, and celebrate how “She Leads the World.

This year, CARE, a leading global humanitarian organization dedicated to empowering women and girls, is celebrating International Women’s Day through the power of portraiture. CARE partnered with high-profile photographer Nigel Barker, best known for his work on “America’s Next Top Model,” to capture breathtaking images of seven remarkable women who have prevailed over countless obstacles to become leaders within their communities.

“Mabinty, Isatu, Adama, and Kadiatu represent so many women around the world overcoming incredible obstacles to lead their communities,” said Michelle Nunn, President and CEO of CARE USA.

Barker’s bold portraits, as part of CARE’s “She Leads The World” campaign, not only elevate each woman’s story, but also shine a spotlight on how CARE programs helped them get to where they are today.

About the women:

Mabinty

international womens day, care.org

Mabinty is a businesswoman and a member of a CARE savings circle along with a group of other women. She buys and sells groundnuts, rice, and fuel. She and her husband have created such a successful enterprise that Mabinty volunteers her time as a teacher in the local school. She was the first woman to teach there, prompting a second woman to do so. Her fellow teachers and students look up to Mabinty as the leader and educator she is.

Kadiatu

international womens day, care.org

Kadiatu supports herself through a small business selling food. She also volunteers at a health clinic in the neighboring village where she is a nursing student. She tests for malaria, works with infants, and joins her fellow staff in dancing and singing with the women who visit the clinic. She aspires to become a full-time nurse so she can treat and cure people. Today, she leads by example and with ambition.

Isatu

international womens day, care.org

When Isatu was three months pregnant, her husband left her, seeking his fortune in the gold mines. Now Isatu makes her own way, buying and selling food to support her four children. It is a struggle, but Isatu is determined to be a part of her community and a provider for her kids. A single mother of four is nothing if not a leader.

Zainab

international womens day, care.org

Zainab is the Nurse in Charge at the Maternal Child Health Outpost in her community. She is the only nurse in the surrounding area, and so she is responsible for the pre-natal health of the community’s mothers-to-be and for the safe delivery of their babies. In a country with one of the world’s worst maternal death rates, Zainab has not lost a single mother. The community rallies around Zainab and the work she does. She describes the women who visit the clinic as sisters. That feeling is clearly mutual.

Adama

international womens day, care.org

Adama is something few women are - a kehkeh driver. A kehkeh is a three-wheeled motorcycle taxi, known elsewhere as a tuktuk. Working in the Kissy neighborhood of Freetown, Adama is the primary breadwinner for her family, including her son. She keeps her riders safe in other ways, too, by selling condoms. With HIV threatening to increase its spread, this is a vital service to the community.

Ya Yaebo

international womens day, care.org

“Ya” is a term of respect for older, accomplished women. Ya Yaebo has earned that title as head of her local farmers group. But there is much more than that. She started as a Village Savings and Loan Association member and began putting money into her business. There is the groundnut farm, her team buys and sells rice, and own their own oil processing machine. They even supply seeds to the Ministry of Agriculture. She has used her success to the benefit of people in need in her community and is a vocal advocate for educating girls, not having gone beyond grade seven herself.

On Monday, March 4, CARE will host an exhibition of photography in New York City featuring these portraits, kicking off the multi-day “She Leads the World Campaign.

Learn more, view the portraits, and join CARE’s International Women's Day "She Leads the World" celebration at CARE.org/sheleads.


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Over or under? Surprisingly, there actually is a 'correct' way to hang a toilet paper roll.

Let's settle this silly-but-surprisingly-heated debate once and for all.

Elya/Wikimedia Commons

Should you hang the toilet paper roll over or under?


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