This surprise Elton John duet with the actor playing him in a new movie is breathtaking.

We’re still glowing from the magic that was Bohemian Rhapsody but 2019 might have something even more special in store for music fans.

Dexter Fletcher, the same director who stepped in to save the troubledBohemian Rhapsody production, is behind Rocketman, which is being described as an “unconventional” take on the rise of Elton John’s music career.

Back in November, we got a taste of what the movie might be like with this viral commercial highlighting some of Elton John’s career milestones. That came right on the heels of the teaser trailer for the film.


But the best evidence yet for the film’s potential came in a real-life performance over the weekend.

As Slashfilm pointed out, while Remi Malek was being celebrated for mostly lip-syncing his way throughBohemian Rhapsody, fellow actor Taron Egerton has learned to sing in an eerily perfect imitation of Elton John for Rocketman.

Things got really incredible on Sunday when John hosted his annual fundraiser for HIV/AIDS research.

Youcan support the Elton John AIDS Foundation here.

Egerton was there in support and was asked to step up and deliver a performance of Elton John’s classic song “Tiny Dancer.” He agreed but on one condition: Only if Elton joined him on piano. The legendary musician agreed and magic ensued.

Seriously, this is amazing.

But think how strangely wonderful it must have been for Elton John himself, literally singing with someone who is a dead ringer for him, at least in vocal performance:

Photo courtesy of Capital One
True

Growing up in Virginia, Dominique Meeks Gombe idolized her family physician — a young Black woman who inspired Meeks Gombe to pursue her passion for chemistry.

While Meeks Gombe began her career working in an environmental chemistry lab, after observing multiple inefficient processes in and around the lab, she took the initiative to teach herself to code in order to automate and streamline those issues.

That sparked her love for coding and imminent career shift. Now a software engineer at Capital One, Meeks Gombe wants to be a similar role model to her childhood mentor and encourage girls to pursue any career they desire.

"I'm so passionate about technology because that's where the world is going," Meeks Gombe said. "All of today's problems will be solved using technology. So it's very important for me, as a Black woman, to be at the proverbial table with my unique perspective."

Since 2019, she and her fellow Capital One associates have partnered with the Capital One Coders program and Girls For A Change to teach coding fundamentals to middle school girls.

The nonprofit's mission is aimed at empowering Black girls in Central Virginia. The organization focuses on designing, leading, funding and implementing social change projects that tackle issues girls face in their own neighborhoods.

Girls For a Change is one of many local nonprofits that receive support from the Capital One Impact Initiative, which strives to close gaps in equity while helping people gain better access to economic and social opportunities. The initial $200 million, five-year national commitment aims to support growth in underserved communities as well as advance socioeconomic mobility.

Keep Reading Show less

Another week of 2021 in the books...and now we're fully into September. Holy moly, how did that happen? Pandemic time is so wild.

Another week means another chance for us to counter the doom-and-gloom headlines with some simple rays of sunshine. Need a reason to smile? Here are 10 of them.

Enjoy.

1. This story of quick-thinking generosity on 9/11 is a reminder of the goodness of ordinary people.

Mercedes Martinez shared a story on Twitter about how her dad rented the biggest van he could find just before his flight was grounded on 9/11 because he knew people were going to be stranded. He ended up driving seven scared strangers from Omaha to Denver, took them straight to their front doors, and refused to accept any payment. She wants to find the people he helped. Read the full story here and follow her thread here for updates.


2. A WWII veteran got to meet the girl who wrote him a letter in the third grade, which he's kept with him for 12 years.

Keep Reading Show less