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Breaking news: Lots of women enjoy drinking beer.

Beer — craft beer in particular — is often thought of as a man's game, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

In fact, some experts believe women actually invented beer, though you wouldn't know it from the way it's sometimes marketed today.


GIF via matchpointHD/YouTube.

Looks like every beer ad ever, right?

It's not just the overly sexed-up commercials that are crossing lines and alienating customers. It's the names of the beers themselves.

Panty Dropper. Leg Spreader. Thong Remover.

As hard as it is to believe, those are real beer names.

Thankfully, it looks like the craft beer industry has finally had enough of sexist and offensive brew names.

Discontent with these kinds of labels has been brewing (yeah, I went there) for years, with both drinkers and brewers alike growing increasingly agitated by immaturity from a handful of breweries.

Now the Brewers Association, one of the largest industry trade bodies, has finally updated its code to crack down on offensive names and labels like these.

While it doesn't have the power to officially ban them, the association can make sure offending breweries don't use its awards, medals, or seal of approval to market beers with offensive labels. The move ought to discourage this kind of desperation to appeal to male drinkers, and it's a small gesture that represents a bigger current of change.

If all of this sounds a little like the fun-police at work, take a look at these labels. Some of them are pretty hard to stomach.

The idea that the only way to appeal to men is through sexual innuendo is offensive to women and men.

We can do better.

1. Panty Peeler, Midnight Sun Brewing

Anything else ready for summer adventures to begin?

A post shared by Midnight Sun Brewing Co. (@midnightsunbrewingco) on

2. Raging Bitch, Flying Dog Brewery

Photo by Antti T. Nissinen/Flickr.

3. Naughty Girl, New Albanian Brewing

Image by New Albanian Brewing.

4. Stacked, Route 2 Brews

Image by Route 2 Brews.

5. Tramp Stamp, Clown Shoes Beer

6. Double D, Fordham & Dominion Brewing

7. Crazy Bitch, Northwest Brewing Company

And the list goes on and on. Angry yet?

The trend of beer names that degrade or objectify women is offensive and unnecessary. Besides, any beer drinker knows the best brews don't need to rely on gross marketing gimmicks to get by.

The latest move from the Brewers Association proves drinkers are ready to hold their beer makers to a higher standard.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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