Heroes

These photorealistic drawings bring attention to something that needs to be paid attention to

Zaria Forman is an artist who works in pastels. She makes hyperrealistic drawings of nature (as you see below) for two reasons: for her mother, who was in love with landscapes, and to remind her audience that a massively important part of our world may not be around too much longer.

These photorealistic drawings bring attention to something that needs to be paid attention to

Yes, that's a drawing.


"Continuing the story of polar melt, which is the main cause of rising seas, I followed the meltwater from the Arctic to the equator. I spent September 2013 in the Maldives, the lowest and flattest country in the world, collecting material and inspiration to create a body of work celebrating and artistically representing a nation that could be entirely underwater within this century." — Zaria Forman

Yes, that's also a drawing! She uses paint in a way I didn't really think possible, to be honest.

The Maldives are currently only five feet above sea level. Much of the comparable land in Louisiana has already sunk.

No, this isn't a photograph. Ms. Forman drew this too. With her fingers.

At this point, I think of Zaria and I'm all:

She could've just drawn these for no reason. They're stunning. But she has a good reason to make you want to stare at these:

"Greenland's ice and permafrost will continue to melt in the coming decades as the planet adjusts to our carbon emissions. It is unfortunate, but inevitable, which is why I find it crucial to render and honor these icescapes in flux, and to help bring awareness to many who's lives will be affected." — Zaria Forman

Yowza, this is my favorite. Look at that reflection. Drawn by one hand. Two hands at the most.

YOU. You reading this. You have two hands. Can you do this? No. Not unless you're Zaria Forman, amazing glacier artist and badass woman.

Well, maybe this is my favorite. I know I've said this twice already. Maybe they're all my favorite. I feel cold just looking at 'em.



This one is awesome too! Maybe this one is my favorite. 100% a drawing.

Bottom line, I'm all:

Keep on doing you, Zaria. Here's an interview with Ms. Forman about her process:

via Pixabay

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