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The Story Behind One Of The Best Before-And-After Photos I've Ever Seen

I admit, I'm not the kind of person who would even take a naked picture, let alone post it online. I get terrified just thinking about it. But there's something so empowering and refreshing about what this woman did, and I'm clearly not the only person who feels that way. She's building a movement for everyone — even those of us who are way too shy to follow in her footsteps — and I'm all in.

The Story Behind One Of The Best Before-And-After Photos I've Ever Seen
Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash

Last year, we shared the sad impact that plastic pollution has had on some of our planet's most beautiful places. With recycling not turning out to be the savior it was made out to be, solutions to our growing plastic problem can seem distant and complex.

We have seen some glimmers of hope from both human innovation and nature itself, however. In 2016, a bacteria that evolved with the ability to break down plastic was discovered in a Japanese waste site. Two years later, scientists managed to engineer the mutant plastic-eating enzyme they called PETase—named for polyethylene terephthalate, the most common plastic found in bottles and food packaging—in a lab.

Here's an explainer of how those enzymes work:

Ending Plastic Pollution with Designer Bacteria youtu.be

Now researchers have revealed another game-changer in the plastic-eater—a super-enzyme that can break down plastic six times faster than PETase alone.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Nike's latest ad challenges a common sexist trope in sports—and people are loving it.

Women have fought for decades to be seen as legitimate competitors in male-dominated fields, including professional and amateur sports. Until the early 20th century, many believed that women were not biologically designed for strenuous exercise (a myth that was ultimately debunked by a female physician, Dr. Celia Duel Mosher). And it wasn't that long ago that showing intense emotion and too much ambition could land a woman in an asylum.

Throughout history, women who tried to compete at a high level were seen as "crazy." Sadly, too often, they still are.

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via DanielandDavid2 / Instagram

Editor's Note: We used "black" in lowercase for our headline and the body of this story in accordance with emerging guidelines from the Associated Press and other trusted news outlets who are using uppercase "Black" in reference to American descendants of the diaspora of individuals forcibly brought from Africa as slaves. As part of our ongoing efforts to be transparent and communicate choices with our readership, we've included this note for clarity. The original story begins below.

On February 26, 2019, Stacy and Babajide Omirin of Lagos, Nigeria got quite the shock. When Stacy delivered identical twins through C-section one came out black and the other, white.

The parents knew they were having identical twins and expected them to look exactly the same. But one has a white-looking complexion and golden, wavy hair.

"It was a massive surprise," Stacy told The Daily Mail. "Daniel came first, and then the nurse said the second baby has golden hair. I thought how can this be possible. I looked down and saw David, he was completely white."

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