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Humans of New York, the popular photo blog you've probably seen on  Facebook, did something a bit unusual on Sept. 8, 2016.

It featured Hillary Clinton.

“I was taking a law school admissions test in a big classroom at Harvard. My friend and I were some of the only women...


Posted by Humans of New York on Thursday, September 8, 2016

The move was pretty out of the ordinary for Humans of New York (HONY), as the series typically stays away from the muddy waters of U.S. politics.

And although you could argue Clinton's inclusion on HONY was political — everything a candidate does in the gleam of the spotlight is political, after all — the post still struck a chord with women of varied political leanings who can relate.

In the post, Clinton opens up about an experience she had in college when classmates tried intimidating her out of taking a test.

"While we’re waiting for the exam to start, a group of men began to yell things like: ‘You don’t need to be here.’ And ‘There’s plenty else you can do.’ It turned into a real ‘pile on,'" Clinton explained in the post. "One of them even said: ‘If you take my spot, I’ll get drafted, and I’ll go to Vietnam, and I'll die.’ And they weren’t kidding around."

Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images.

Clinton goes on to explain it was moments like these that taught her, as a woman, she needed to be extra careful in handling her emotions publicly.

It speaks to the double standards often applied to women when it comes to how they should express themselves and their emotions (double standards that, by the way, also hurt men too).

The best part about Clinton's post, however, was how it resonated with other women online.

Many of the commenters were't too kind, as you can imagine.

But there were also many notes from women chiming in on the fact that, regardless of how you feel about Clinton the candidate, her experience shines a light on the type of sexism half the population still has to deal with all the time.

Like how society's mixed messages on how women should think and act can create impossible standards to uphold.

Or how — even to commenters who aren't fans of Clinton — the candidate's firsthand experience hits very close to home.

Of course, in Clinton's case, these double standards have been thrown into a spotlight for the world to see. And it's not pretty.

Other commenters noted how double standards affect all of our perceptions, oftentimes in subconscious ways.

And some gave a shoutout to the women who overcome this type of treatment and keep going.  

Clinton's HONY story was impactful because, in a certain sense, it wasn't really about her at all.

People with various political leanings were able to empathize with what she went through. They know how these double standards have affected their own lives in very real ways.

Thousands of people were able to connect with one another over shared experiences in a single Facebook thread. And it had little to do with the candidate who started the conversation.

Clinton's story got to the heart of a much bigger message: We all have emotions, and we should all be free to express them however we choose — regardless of our gender (or the office we're running for).

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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