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John Oliver is known for his biting political commentary and smart comedy, but some of his best takes have emerged in casual conversation.

In February of 2018, Oliver joined Stephen Colbert on The Late Show and discussed the pending nuptials of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, who were married a few months later. When asked if he was excited about the wedding, Oliver gave a candid response that turned out to be remarkably prescient.

First, he said that he was not, in fact, excited about the wedding. Surprised, Colbert pointed out that Harry was marrying an American and Oliver had married an American, and asked if he had any advice for Harry. Instead, Oliver spoke of his sympathy for Meghan Markle.

"I would not blame her if she pulled out of this at the last minute," he said. "I don't think you need to have just seen the pilot episode of 'The Crown' to get a basic sense she might be marrying into a family that could cause her some emotional complications."

Colbert said, "But this generation seems like nice people, right? They're all nice now, right?"

"Yyyyyeah," Oliver responded. "I mean, they're an emotionally stunted group of fundamentally flawed people doing a silly pseudo-job. That's what she's marrying into. So I hope she likes it. It's going to be weird for her."

"I would not marry into the Royal Family," he added. "I'm a commoner, I would not be welcome—especially after what I've just said," he laughed.

Colbert and Oliver chatted joked about how Oliver's potential knighthood was now off the table, then Oliver shared his thoughts on the displays of reverence people show to the crown.

"It's just weird to kneel in front of another adult. It's odd. I know that historically you read and you see people kneeling down and kissing the ring, but it's a bit strange. It's an odd thing to still have."

Oliver's statements echo what many people feel about the monarchy—that it's an archaic institution that has outlived whatever relevance and usefulness it may have once had. Then again, the royal tradition is a powerful force in the U.K. and Queen Elizabeth is genuinely beloved—even by Harry and Meghan who are making headlines for sharing the issues they've had with the Royal Family as an institution (in addition to specific members they refused to name). Some love the pomp and the pagaentry and are willing to turn a blind eye to the problematic history that goes along with it.

It will be interesting to see what changes if and when Charles—who does not carry the "beloved" mantle of his mother—ascends to the throne. Will people lose some of the love and respect they have for the crown now? Will generations who have only known Queen Elizabeth as monarch view the entire institution differently in her absence? Naturally, the changing of a monarch has always been a transition, but society has changed a lot since 1953, when Elizabeth became queen. People may not be as forgiving of the faults of the Royal Family without its sweet, stalwart matriarch at the helm.

Since John Oliver nailed the Meghan Markle situation so accurately, perhaps his view of the monarchy will also be seen as a self-evident truth someday. Guess we'll see.

Gender-based violence in South Africa is not just a problem, it's a "national crisis," according to South Africa's president, Cyril Ramaphosa. Official figures state 137 sexual offences are committed each day, and more than 30 women were killed by their spouses last month. Between April 2018 and March 2019, an alarming 66,992 sexual offenses were reported.

The country is working to combat the problem, and this week, girls received support in the form of an inspirational speech from Meghan Markle. During a royal tour of South Africa, the Duchess and Prince Harry visited Cape Town's Nyanga township to speak out against gender-based violence. Nyanga is known as South Africa's "murder capital," with 289 murders reported in the area last year alone.

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While in South Africa, the royal couple visited Justice Desk, a human rights group that helps girls who've been the victims of rape and abuse. There, Meghan and Harry danced with children, heard personal stories from women affected by gender-based violence in the region, and watched girls take a self-defense class.

Meghan spoke to a crowd of 250 people, bringing them a message of hope. "We are encouraged to hear your president take the next step towards preventing gender-based violence through education and necessary changes to reinforce the values of modern South Africa. I have to say, I feel incredibly humble to be in the presence of all of you as you stand firm in your core values of respect, dignity, and equality," the Duchess said.



RELATED: Meghan Markle made sure freckles weren't airbrushed out of her guest-edited Vogue cover

Meghan also mentioned her black heritage, the first time she has done so since marrying into the royal family. "On one personal note, may I just say that while I am here with my husband as a member of the royal family, I want you to know that for me, I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of color, and as your sister. I am here with you, and I am here for you, and thank you for showing us your Ubuntu [spirit of togetherness]," she continue

Prince Harry also spoke out against violence towards women. "No man is born to cause harm to women," he said. "This is learned behavior and a cycle that needs to be broken."

He also called for men to step up and treat women better. "So now, it's about redefining masculinity, it's about creating your own footprints for your children to follow in, so that you can make a positive change for the future. To me, the real testament of your strength isn't physical, it's what's up here and what's in here. Your strength is in your spirit, which for me means honoring and protecting my wife, and being a positive role model for my son," he continued.

RELATED: Meghan Markle and Prince Harry just delivered a very personal and positive message to sex workers

Earlier this month, women staged a multi-day protest following a wave of violence. President Ramaphosa has promised to make efforts to curb gender-based violence. "We have established 92 dedicated sexual offences courts since 2013, with a further 11 to be opened this financial year. I will propose to cabinet that all crimes against women and children should attract harsher minimum sentences," he said while addressing the country.

Prince Harry isn't just a member of England's royal family - he's also a new dad. He and Duchess Meghan of Sussex welcomed Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor into the world last month. He joins William and Kate's three offspring (George, Charlotte, and Lewis) as royal grandchildren. I assume he's being accordingly spoiled with elaborate titles, jewels, and small islands.




Archie was born on May 6 and immediately became the subject of memes, tweets, and international speculation. Honestly? It's probably for the best that's he's a baby and doesn't know what's going on. All that scrutiny is way too intense for the average person. That said: Archie's far from average. He's the newest addition to the globe's most famous royal family.


Harry and Megan recognized Father's Day by posting an adorable photo of baby Archie to Instagram. It's already amassed 1.5 million likes and over 22,000 comments.






This article originally appeared on SomeeCards. You can read it here.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's glorious wedding was one for the history books.

Photo by Brian Lawless-WPA Pool/Getty Images.

In a display of fairy tale magic, the duke and duchess of Sussex said their vows in front of millions of viewers around the world. It. Was. Beautiful.  


Photo by Yui Mok-WPA Pool/Getty Images.

Photo by Danny Lawson-WPA Pool/Getty Images.

Photo by Dominic Lipinski-WPA Pool/Getty Images

Roughly 18 million people in the U.K. tuned into the event, and it's safe to say Americans were pretty enamored with the stunning affair as well.  

The road up to the wedding was no easy feat. Fighting unethical press, sexism, and racism, Harry and Markle held strong together. Thankfully, they made it to their happy ending.

Aside from the dashing uniforms, stunning gowns, and oh-so-adorable kiddos, the wedding was an incredible display of revolutionary love. Here are five ways the new couple made their love as radical as can be:    

1. They are one of the first publicly recognized interracial couples in the British monarchy.

Harry and Markle are not the first interracial couple in British monarchy history. Due to the monarchy's fickleness with showing blackness in paintings (such as black features, hair textures, etc.), it's unclear who actually holds that title. But, it's likely to go back to Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz of the 18th century, a mixed-race woman who married King George III. With about seven generations between Charlotte and Markle, the visibility is long overdue.

Photo by Jonathan Brady-WPA Pool/Getty Images.

2. Markle was "accompanied" down the aisle not "given away."

A self-proclaimed feminist, Markle made it clear from her earliest days with Harry that she would not be one to follow tradition if it didn't align with her values.This became evident through details like the style of the wedding to the choice of the cake maker and in other traditions, like Markle's walk down the aisle.  

In most Western weddings, a bride's father walks her down the aisle to "give her away" to her husband, steeped in a tradition of treating women like property that can be transferred. Markle, whose father was unable to attend the wedding, chose to walk the first part of the aisle alone and then was joined by Prince Charles for the remainder. Most important was the language used around this aspect of the ceremony: Markle was "accompanied" down the aisle.

Photo by Jonathan Brady-WPA Pool/Getty Images.

Given the U.K.'s staunch traditionalism, Markle's prominent decision was an important display of autonomy and a woman's ability to make her own choices even in a committed marriage. It also serves as a beautiful reminder that traditions can be honored and altered to reflect a progressive marriage that allows both individuals to own their choices.

3. The sermon was a legendary display of black ministry and love.  

Bishop Michael Curry, the first black presiding bishop and primate of the Episcopal Church, brought down the house with a powerful sermon called "The Power of Love," citing love's redemptive and powerful capabilities. Speaking of Gilead, slavery, and the importance of mutual respect in loving relationships, Curry's sermon was one of the most moving portions of the ceremony. Discussing the complexity of humanity and love's role in moving it forward, Curry proclaimed, "Love is the only way. There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power, power in love."

Photo by Owen Humphreys-WPA Pool/Getty Images.

Markle, who was key in the decision to break from tradition and involve an  American bishop in the ceremony, was visibly moved by the speech. Given Britain's horrific role in slavery and colonization, Curry's sermon was a reminder that redemption is possible only when we allow love to lead and guide us in our lives.

4. The couple's actions and mannerisms spoke volumes about their affection for one another.  

Of course, no one knows the ins and outs of Markle and Harry's relationship except them, but if the wedding was any indication, these two remind us that love can be so, so real. Endless research points to how body language often offers insights into a couple's relationship. From simple gestures such as Harry rubbing Markle's thumb during the ceremony to his loving words once she reached the alter, the two shared interactions that looked like they were pulled straight out of a fairy tale.  

In times when love is often mocked or deemed impossible, their public display of affection were subtle reminders that there is magic and love and vulnerability, and it still totally exists.

5. Markle's black roots radiated through the church.  

In spite of a media that seemed to both question and criticize Markle's blackness, she incorporated her culture in some of the most beautiful ways. In addition to Curry's sermon,the Kingdom Choir, led by Karen Gibson, sang a stunning rendition of "Stand By Me" for the ceremony. Sheku Kanneh-Mason, a cellist handpicked by the royal couple moved the crowd with his renditions of Franz Schubert's "Ave Maria," Gabriel Fauré's "Après un rêve," and Maria Theresia von Paradis' "Sicilienne."  

Markle's effortless incorporation of her culture showed the world how proud she is of her roots, and it's a sign that her blackness will be centered in her public role in the U.K.

From endless fairy tale photographs to smiling faces around the room, Harry and Markle's wedding ceremony provided some much needed joy in a complicated world. Hopefully, it's just the beginning.