Prince Harry opens up about mental health struggles and how he got help.

It's taken Prince Harry nearly 20 years to unpack some very complex feelings.

In 2016, a few members of the royal family got together and made a viral video promoting a mental health awareness campaign.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry in 2016. Photo by Nicky J Sims/Getty Images for Royal Foundation.

The video for the campaign, called Heads Together, is super cute and got a lot of positive attention at the time.


A year later, we've finally learned more about what inspired the royals to speak out.

Prince Harry opened up about his own mental health in an interview with The Telegraph's Bryony Gordon and shared how it was shaped by his mother's sudden death when he was just 12. He also shared what finally led him to seek treatment over a decade after her passing. While the specific details — being in the spotlight from a young age, losing a parent — are unique to Harry's specific situation, his approach to addressing his mental health is super relatable.

Princess Diana and her son Harry at a parade in 1992. Photo by Allan Lewis/AFP/Getty Images.

For Harry, it was a combination of counseling, boxing, and being willing to listen to his older brother's advice.

In the interview, Harry confesses that he has "probably been very close to a complete breakdown on numerous occasions," but it wasn't until his brother and others close to him stepped in to urge him to find help that he was able to put himself on a path for success.

Harry visits a boxing club in 2016. Photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas - WPA Pool/Getty Images.

There's no single "fix" for depression, anxiety, or any other mental health challenges. It's never as simple as saying, "OK, go take this pill and you'll feel better" or "Seeing a counselor will fix you up." Finding your own unique solution to mental wellness is often trial and error; thankfully, Harry found what worked for him.

He hopes that being open about his experiences will help others feel less alone.

"The experience I have had is that once you start talking about it, you realize that actually you’re part of quite a big club," he explained.

Photo by Joe Giddins - WPA Pool/Getty Images.

According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 300 million people around the world are affected by depression. Another 60 million live with bipolar affective disorder, 21 million with schizophrenia, and 47.5 million with dementia.

No one is immune to mental illness.

"I know there is huge merit in talking about your issues, and the only thing about keeping it quiet is that it’s only ever going to make it worse," Harry said in the interview. "Not just for you but everybody else around you as well because you become a problem. I, through a lot of my 20s, was a problem, and I didn’t know how to deal with it."

If you or someone you know struggles with mental illness, you can get help. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has a website dedicated to mental health issues, and of course, there's Heads Together, the U.K. organization behind last year's video.

Harry's entire interview with Gordon is worth checking out, and the full 27-minute version can be streamed below.

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Courtesy of Macy's

In many ways, 18-year-old Idaho native, Hank Cazier, is like any other teenager you've met. He loves chocolate, pop music, and playing games with his family. He has lofty dreams of modeling for a major clothing company one day. But one thing that sets him apart may also jeopardize his future is his recent battle against a brain tumor.

Cazier was diagnosed in 2015. When he had surgery to remove the tumor, he received trauma to his brain and lost some of his motor functionality. He's been in physical, occupational, and speech therapy ever since. The experience impacted Cazier's confidence and self-esteem, so he's been looking for a way to build himself back up again.

"I wanted to do something that helped me look forward to the future," he says.

Enter Make-A-Wish, a nonprofit organization that grants wishes for children battling critical illnesses, providing them a chance to make the impossible possible. The organization partnered with Macy's to raise awareness and help make those wishes a reality. The hope is that the "wish effect" will improve their quality of life and empower them with the strength they need to overcome these illnesses and look towards the future. That was a particularly big deal for Cazier, who had been feeling like so many of his wishes weren't going to be possible because of his critical illness.

"In the beginning, it was hard to accept that it would be improbable for me to accomplish my previous goals because my illness took away so many of my physical abilities," says Cazier. His wish of becoming a model also seemed out of reach.

But Macy's and Make-A-Wish didn't see it like that. Once they learned about Cazier's wish, they knew he had to make it come true by inviting him to be part of the magical Macy's holiday shoot in New York.

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Make-A-Wish can't fulfill children's wishes without the generosity of donors and partners like Macy's. In fact, since 2003, Macy's has given more than $122 million to Make-A-Wish and impacted the lives of more than 2.9 million people.

Cazier's wish experience was beyond what he could've imagined, and it filled him with so much joy and confidence. "It is like waking up and discovering that you have super powers. It feels amazing!" he exclaims.

One of the best parts about the day for him was the kindness everyone who helped make it happen showed him.

"The employees of Macy's and Make-A-Wish made me feel welcome, warm, and cared for," he says. "I am truly grateful that even though they were busy doing their jobs, they were able to show kindness and compassion towards me in all of the little details."

He also got to spend part of the shoot outdoors, which, as someone who loves climbing, hiking, and scuba-diving but has trouble doing those activities now, was very welcome.

Courtesy of Macy's

Overall, Cazier feels he grew a lot during his modeling wish and is now emboldened to work towards a better quality of life. "I want to acquire skills that help me continue to improve in these circumstances," he says.

You can change the lives of more kids like Cazier just by writing a letter to Santa and dropping it in the big red letterbox at Macy's (you can also write and submit one online). For every letter received before Dec. 24, 2019, Macy's will donate $1 to Make-A-Wish, up to $1 million. By writing a letter to Santa, you can help a child replace fear with confidence, sadness with joy, and anxiety with hope.

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