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Prince Harry got tested for HIV. The video is refreshingly relatable.

"It's a simple finger-prick test and gives a nearly instant result."

Prince Harry got tested for HIV. The video is refreshingly relatable.

On July 14, 2016, Prince Harry got tested for HIV — and broadcast the experience live on Facebook.

Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images.

Prince Harry wanted to reduce the stigma surrounding the virus, while encouraging others — "whether [they're] a man, woman, gay, straight, black or white — even ginger," he noted with a grin — to know their status.


In some respects, his experience was a bit different than what regular people like you or me would expect out of trip to the clinic.

For instance, we likely wouldn't shake hands with the whole staff.

Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images.

But in many ways, the prince's experience was refreshingly relatable. He was, for instance, a bit "anxious" beforehand.

That's understandable.

Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images.

Nerves are totally normal before getting tested for HIV (and, let's be real, pretty much any test that involves a needle). But as advocates argue, you should never allow fear to affect your health

Harry learned quite a bit about sexual health while he was there, too.

Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images.

He's no expert on the topic — and you certainly don't have to be to get tested. That's one important reason why sexual health clinics exist in the first place — to help you get in-the-know on STI treatments and prevention, so you can live life to the fullest.

The prince said he was surprised at how speedy the whole process was.

“It’s amazing how quick it is," he noted after learning he'd have answers within seconds of the small prick on his finger.

Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images.

The results would either be "non-reactive," meaning a patient is HIV-negative, or "reactive," which suggests the patient is HIV-positive. A "reactive" result would need to be confirmed in the lab following the test.

Prince Harry doesn't have HIV, but regardless of the outcome of the test, simply knowing your status can take a huge burden off many patients, according to Robert Palmer, who performed the test at the London clinic.

“[Patients] can feel much better, straight away,” he explained, agreeing with the prince's assessment that simply getting folks in the door is often half the battle.

Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images.

And while no patient wants their results to come back positive, of course, it's vital to remember that getting an HIV-positive diagnosis no longer means what it did 30 years ago.

"People [who are HIV-positive] are living long and healthy lives," Robert said, noting that patients who seek treatment can have fulfilling sexual relationships, work full-time, and enjoy their retirements.

As advocates point out, the worst thing about HIV isn't having it — it's not knowing if you do or not.

Watch Prince Harry get an HIV test below:

Want to know your status and get tested for HIV?

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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