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Prince Harry and Prince William just shot down rumors about 'bullying' Meghan Markle

At times, media coverage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's relationship has been unfair, mean, and even downright racist. The couple has hinted that inflammatory media coverage is part of the reason why they're stepping down as senior royals. But just because they're removing themselves from the family doesn't mean the pounding in the press is going away anytime soon. Prince Harry just called out the Times of London for publishing a "potentially harmful" story about "Megxit." This is why we can't have nice things.


The Times of London reported that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle felt pushed out of the family by an unfriendly and unwelcoming Prince William and Duchess Kate. The report insinuated that Prince William had a "bullying attitude," pitting the brothers against each other.

RELATED: Meghan Markle made sure freckles weren't airbrushed out of her guest-edited Vogue cover

Prince Harry and Prince William issued a joint statement saying reports Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are leaving the royal family because of "bullying" are false. "Despite clear denials, a false story ran in a U.K. newspaper today speculating about the relationship between The Duke of Sussex and The Duke of Cambridge," the statement said. They went as far as to call the report "offensive and potentially harmful" because of its "use of inflammatory language."

Prince Harry and Markle are currently involved in a lawsuit against several British publications for their coverage of Markle. "Unfortunately, my wife has become one of the latest victims of a British tabloid press that wages campaigns against individuals with no thought to the consequences – a ruthless campaign that has escalated over the past year, throughout her pregnancy and while raising our newborn son," Prince Harry said. "There is a human cost to this relentless propaganda, specifically when it is knowingly false and malicious, and though we have continued to put on a brave face – as so many of you can relate to – I cannot begin to describe how painful it has been."

RELATED: Meghan Markle delivers powerful speech on gender-based violence in South Africa: 'I am here with you as a woman of color and as your sister'

In a documentary about how harmful the British press was towards the Sussexes, Markle told ITV reporter Tom Bradby she was unprepared for how scathing the press would be. "Look, any woman when they're — especially when they're pregnant, you're really vulnerable, and so that was made really challenging, and then when you have a newborn" Markle said in the interview, "it's a lot. So you add this on top of just trying to be a new mom or trying to be a newlywed."


The good news is that the Queen is supportive of the soon-to-be former royals' decision. "My family and I are entirely supportive of Harry and Meghan's desire to create a new life as a young family," the Queen said in a statement. "Although we would have preferred them to remain full-time working Members of the Royal Family, we respect and understand their wish to live a more independent life as a family while remaining a valued part of my family."

Prince Harry and Markle have also outlined the changes in how they plan to deal with the media, hopefully changes for the better.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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