Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's baby will be a Royal, but won’t be raised as one.
​Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images​.

Months after tying the knot this May, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are already at work growing their family.

On October 15th, the Royal couple announced that Markle is pregnant with their first child due, Spring 2019, leaving the general public wondering what to expect now that Prince Harry and Markle are expecting.

For starters, Prince Harry and Markle’s child will be considered a “minor royal,” which means the child won’t bear the title “Prince”or “Princess.”


If it’s a boy, his title will be “Earl of Dumbarton,” and if it’s a girl, her title will be “Lady Mountbatten-Windsor,” unless the Queen decides to step in and give the child the title of “Prince” or "Princess.”

There's also a possibility that Prince Harry and Markle will decline giving their child a title at all.

Unlike Prince William’s children, Prince Harry’s offspring won’t be in direct line of succession to the throne.

This means that Prince Harry and Markle’s future children will lead very different lives than that of their cousins, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis.

Prince Harry and Markle have plans to give their child as normal of a life as possible. As royal correspondent Omid Scobie tells US Weekly, “Meghan will take her kids on the subway. They’ll have chores, and jobs one day. They won’t be spoiled.” Scobie states that this is part of Markle’s plan to, “bring up children who know the values of normal things in life.” Reportedly, they will bring their child up outside of London by spending time in their Cotswold home, keeping their family away from the hustle and bustle of city life.

Prince Harry and Markle aren’t just passing their genes onto their offspring, they’re also passing on their compassion, according to Entertainment Tonight. “Meghan and Harry, who want to use their platform and profile to further their humanitarian and charitable interests, want to pass on those same values to their children,” says a source.

Photo by Paul Grover- WPA Pool/Getty Images.

Prince Harry seems to be following the example of his mother, Princess Diana, who famously tried to give her royal sons a grounded childhood. Princess Diana made a point to give the young princess normal experiences, such as going to McDonald's and Disney World.

Markle’s upbringing was anything but royal. The former actress paid her way through college, and, as a teenager, her mother made her work in soup kitchens on Los Angeles’s Skid Row. Markle’s social worker and yoga teacher mother, Doria Ragland, will reportedly be hands on with the new Royal, playing an active grandmother role.

We’re excited for the new Royal baby, but we’re even more excited to hear the child will grow up grounded.  Hopefully, Prince Harry and Markle’s child will give back to those who weren’t lucky enough to be born into literal royalty.

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