The touching reason Lady Gaga called Prince William to thank him.

Lady Gaga is a big fan of the royal family's mental health awareness campaign — so much so that she gave Prince William a call from her kitchen to thank him for it.

On April 18, 2017, Kensington Palace shared a video of the two candidly FaceTiming across the ocean, chatting about the royal family's Heads Together initiative — an effort to get more people in the U.K. (and elsewhere) to de-stigmatize mental illness and speak up about their own experiences with mental health treatments.

Photo via Kensington Palace/Twitter.


In the video, Gaga — who, in 2016, shared that she's living with PTSD — praised Prince William, Prince Harry, and Princess Kate's efforts on the issue.

The campaign, she noted, has reminded her how much opening up about her own mental health changed her life.

"Even though it was hard," she explained, "it was the best thing that could come out of my mental illness — was to share it with other people."

As Prince William explains in the video, the royal family decided to prioritize mental illness awareness in part because it's such an intersectional topic, affecting other issues like addiction treatment, homelessness, and caring for veterans.

"Most of [these other causes] seemed to stem back to mental health issues," the prince shared.

Many Twitter users applauded the video's message and the duo's joining of forces to take on an important issue:

The topic of mental illness is also deeply personal within the royal family.

Just this week, Prince Harry opened up about his own struggles with mental illness years ago, dealing with the death of a parent at a young age as the entire world watched.

There was no magic "fix," of course — no one pill or single trip to a counselor made his mental health struggles disappear, Prince Harry told The Telegraph. But just taking that first (and often most difficult) step — opening up to others —  put him on the right path to feeling better.

"The experience I have had," he said, "is that once you start talking about it, you realize that actually you’re part of quite a big club."

Watch Lady Gaga and Prince William's conversation below:

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Image by Brent Connelly from Pixabay and sixthformpoet / Twitter

Twitter user Matt, who goes by the name @SixthFormPoet, shared a dark love story on Twitter that's been read by nearly 600,000 people. It starts in a graveyard and feels like it could be the premise for a Tim Burton film.

While it's hard to verify whether the story is true, Matt insists that it's real, so we'll believe him.

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"Clay's tallest story" is one we should all stop to listen to, no matter how much we think we know about mental health. What starts off as a forgettable fishing video quickly turns into a powerful metaphor about mental health.

What would you do if an unexpected gust of wind pushed your boat out to sea? You'd call for help. It's so obvious, why would anyone think differently? But when it comes to our mental health, things often appear so much more unnecessarily complicated. Thanks for the reminder, Clay!


Clay’s Tallest Story www.youtube.com

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Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Approximately 10% of the population is left-handed, and the balance between lefties and righties has been the same for almost 5,000 years. People used to believe that left-handed people were evil or unlucky. The word "sinister" is even derived from the Latin word for "left."

In modern times, the bias against lefties for being different is more benign – spiral notebooks are a torture device, and ink gets on their hands like a scarlet letter. Now, a new study conducted at the University of Oxford and published in Brain is giving left-handers some good news. While left-handers have been struggling with tools meant for right-handers all these years, it turns out, they actually possess superior verbal skills.

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Pete the Plant is a maidenhair fern living in the Rainforest Life exhibit at the London Zoo, but Pete the Plant isn't like other plants. Pete the Plant is also a budding photographer. Scientists in the Zoological Society of London's (ZSL) conservation tech unit has been teaching the plant how to take selfies.

The ZSL held a competition in partnership with Open Plant, Cambridge University, and the Arribada Initiative for the design of a fuel cell powered by plants. Plant E in the Netherlands produced the winning design. The prototype cell creates electricity from the waste from the plant's roots. The electricity will be used to charge a battery that's attached to a camera. Once Pete the Plant grows strong enough, it will then use the camera to take a selfie. Not too bad for a plant.

"As plants grow, they naturally deposit biomatter into the soil they're planted in, which bacteria in the soil feeds on – this creates energy that can be harnessed by fuel cells and used to power a wide range of conservation tools," Al Davies, ZSL's conservation technology specialist, explains.

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