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Prince Harry opens up about mental health struggles and how he got help.

It's taken Prince Harry nearly 20 years to unpack some very complex feelings.

Prince Harry opens up about mental health struggles and how he got help.

In 2016, a few members of the royal family got together and made a viral video promoting a mental health awareness campaign.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry in 2016. Photo by Nicky J Sims/Getty Images for Royal Foundation.

The video for the campaign, called Heads Together, is super cute and got a lot of positive attention at the time.


A year later, we've finally learned more about what inspired the royals to speak out.

Prince Harry opened up about his own mental health in an interview with The Telegraph's Bryony Gordon and shared how it was shaped by his mother's sudden death when he was just 12. He also shared what finally led him to seek treatment over a decade after her passing. While the specific details — being in the spotlight from a young age, losing a parent — are unique to Harry's specific situation, his approach to addressing his mental health is super relatable.

Princess Diana and her son Harry at a parade in 1992. Photo by Allan Lewis/AFP/Getty Images.

For Harry, it was a combination of counseling, boxing, and being willing to listen to his older brother's advice.

In the interview, Harry confesses that he has "probably been very close to a complete breakdown on numerous occasions," but it wasn't until his brother and others close to him stepped in to urge him to find help that he was able to put himself on a path for success.

Harry visits a boxing club in 2016. Photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas - WPA Pool/Getty Images.

There's no single "fix" for depression, anxiety, or any other mental health challenges. It's never as simple as saying, "OK, go take this pill and you'll feel better" or "Seeing a counselor will fix you up." Finding your own unique solution to mental wellness is often trial and error; thankfully, Harry found what worked for him.

He hopes that being open about his experiences will help others feel less alone.

"The experience I have had is that once you start talking about it, you realize that actually you’re part of quite a big club," he explained.

Photo by Joe Giddins - WPA Pool/Getty Images.

According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 300 million people around the world are affected by depression. Another 60 million live with bipolar affective disorder, 21 million with schizophrenia, and 47.5 million with dementia.

No one is immune to mental illness.

"I know there is huge merit in talking about your issues, and the only thing about keeping it quiet is that it’s only ever going to make it worse," Harry said in the interview. "Not just for you but everybody else around you as well because you become a problem. I, through a lot of my 20s, was a problem, and I didn’t know how to deal with it."

If you or someone you know struggles with mental illness, you can get help. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has a website dedicated to mental health issues, and of course, there's Heads Together, the U.K. organization behind last year's video.

Harry's entire interview with Gordon is worth checking out, and the full 27-minute version can be streamed below.

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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

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Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

This article originally appeared on 5.7.15



The Story of Bottled Water www.youtube.com

Here are six facts from the video above by The Story of Stuff Project that I'll definitely remember next time I'm tempted to buy bottled water.

1. Bottled water is more expensive than tap water (and not just a little).

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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