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21 funny, heartwarming pics from Prince Harry's visit to Nepal.

The prince has a soft spot in his heart for Nepal.

1. Prince Harry is on an eventful five-day trip through Nepal.

Photo by Chris Jackson - WPA Pool/Getty Images.


2. He's there to celebrate the country's culture and resiliency after earthquakes caused devastation in April and May 2015.

Photo by Narendra Shrestha/AFP/Getty Images.

3. So far, he's met a lot of remarkable people, like Kamal Thapa, the country's deputy prime minister...

Photo by Ben Birchall-Pool/Getty Images.

4. ...and 86-year-old Pakuli Gurung, whose home was destroyed in the earthquakes.

Photo by Ben Birchall - Pool/Getty Images.

Thankfully, a new one is being built for her and her family.

5. These children from the village of Bhir Kuna looked pretty excited to tell the prince, "namaste," as well.

Photo by Ben Birchall - Pool/Getty Images.

The phrase is a respectful greeting in Hindu culture in Nepal and India.

6. In the village of Okhari, Harry took part in Holi, a Hindu celebration of the full moon that comes every spring.

Photo by James Whatling - Pool/Getty Images.

7. If you couldn't tell, Holi is all about the bright colors...

Photo by James Whatling - Pool/Getty Images.

The prince learned that the fun way.

8. ...and not being afraid to get a little messy, too.

Photo by James Whatling - Pool/Getty Images.

9. He also played a friendly game of volleyball with local kids whose school was damaged by an earthquake.

Photo by Paul Edwards - Pool/Getty Images.

10. When Harry wasn't visiting ancient sites like Hiranya Varna Mahavihar (aka the Golden Temple)...

Photo by Ben Birchall - Pool/Getty Images.

11. ...he was proclaimed "village head man" by locals in Leorani, who welcomed the prince with a special title and a pheta turban.

Photo by Chris Jackson - Pool/Getty Images.

12. Harry also dined on Nepali cuisine with the locals.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images.

13. He roamed the countryside to take in the majestic views.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images.

14. And found an absolutely perfect spot to take a breather.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images.

Because even a prince needs a moment to let it all sink in.

15. But beyond the fun, games, and beautiful views, Harry paid special attention to those most affected by tragedy.

Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/AFP/Getty Images.

16. He met with displaced families whose whole lives have been uprooted by the earthquakes.

Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/AFP/Getty Images.

17. In case you need reminding, the disasters wreaked havoc last spring.

Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/AFP/Getty Images.

On April 25, 2015, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake rocked the mountainous country, killing more than 8,000 people. A couple of weeks later, a 7.3 quake took even more lives.

18. And although the country is on the path to recovery, a lot of people are still in need of help.

Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/AFP/Getty Images.

Harry visited displaced survivors in the Bhaktapur camp, where about 60 families are still living in tents, according to the Associated Press. The camp is just one of several throughout the country filled with folks with nowhere else to turn.

19. Harry was inspired by the Nepali people's bravery after tragedy struck, which is why he decided to visit in the first place.


Photo by Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images.

20. His parents had visited the South Asian nation, and he says it will always have a special place in his heart.

Photo by Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images.

“I am honored and excited to be here,” the prince said during his visit, as The Telegraph reported. “Many members of my family have visited Nepal, including my father and my mother, who were both warmly welcomed."

"For me, this trip is also personal. I am so grateful that I will have the opportunity to pay tribute to some of Nepal's most famous ambassadors, the Gurkhas, admired the world over for their fearsome bravery and courage, but also for their humility and kindness.”

21. Harry's journey abroad is a reminder that just because most of the news crews have packed up and left, Nepal should not be forgotten.

Photo by Paul Edwards - Pool/Getty Images.

To learn more about how you can help out, visit Unicef.

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