SreyRam Kuy was 2 years old when the refugee camp where her family had been staying was bombed.

They had been fleeing the “Killing Fields” of the Cambodian genocide, only to be attacked again.

During the bombing, both she and her mother were hit by shrapnel. She lost her ear in the explosion, and her mother’s wounds would’ve likely been fatal without proper medical attention, but thankfully, Red Cross doctors came to their aid, saving both SreyRam’s ear and her mom’s life.

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L'Oréal Paris Women of Worth

Last year Brie Larson presented Casey Affleck with the Oscar for Best Actor, and it was ... uncomfortable.

Just a year earlier, Larson had won the Oscar for her powerhouse performance in "Room," playing a woman who was held kidnapped, sexually assaulted, and forced to live in captivity with her young son. Hers was a moving performance that reflected a lot of Larson's own advocacy work for victims of sexual harassment and violence. But then she was asked to present one of acting's top honors to Affleck, who had been sued on multiple occasions for sexual harassment years earlier.

The audience erupted in applause as Affleck's name was announced and he took the stage — with one very notable exception: Larson. After offering Affleck a polite hug, she stood off to the side, motionless. In a pre-#MeToo, pre-Time's Up environment, her reluctance to follow the unspoken rules of being a presenter was a statement in itself.

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This little owl seems to be stuck between "I've totally got this!" and "Oh God, why?" and it's hilarious.

"So are we going to help him?" "If we don't ignore him, he'll just keep doing this." Photo by Tibor Kerccz/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards.

This image, one of a set captured by photographer Tibor Kerccz, isn't merely amusing. It beat out over 3,500 other entries from 86 different countries to be named the 2017 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards' grand winner.

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Representation in television matters. It empowers the voiceless, challenges stereotypes, and inspires people in very real ways.

"The day I saw Whoopi Goldberg on television, I cried so hard," comedian Leslie Jones told co-hosts on "The View" in July. "Because I kept looking at my daddy going, 'Oh my God! There's somebody on TV who looks like me! She looks like me! Daddy! I can be on TV. I can be on TV. "

When the Primetime Emmys air on Sept. 18, 2016, you'll notice at least one person of color is nominated in every single leading acting category (that's never happened before!), and a notable 25% of all acting nods went to non-white performers — an improvement from last year and 2014, and much more diverse than the overall figure throughout history.

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