Oprah's powerful Golden Globes speech brings the nation to a standing ovation.

Of the many highlights of this year's Golden Globes, it was Oprah Winfrey's Cecil B. DeMille Award acceptance speech that will have people talking for years to come.

Greeted with a standing ovation, Winfrey opened her speech with an anecdote about Sidney Poitier's path to a 1964 Oscar win and 1982 Cecil B. DeMille Award victory. As she stood on stage, becoming the first black woman to  win that same award, she pivoted to events beyond the world of entertainment: the press, the modern political landscape, and the #MeToo movement.  

"We all know the press is under siege these days," she said, a thinly veiled criticism of a president hellbent on labeling information he doesn't like as "fake." "We also know it's the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice — to tyrants and victims, and secrets and lies."


"I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times." All GIFs from Golden Globes/YouTube.

"What I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have." — Oprah Winfrey

"I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times, which brings me to this: What I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have," she continued. "And I'm especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year we became the story."

The #MeToo movement is about more than the present; it’s for those in the past who never received justice.

Winfrey told the story of a woman named Recy Taylor, a black woman abducted and assaulted by six white men. Threatened into silence, Taylor died just days ago, her assailants never receiving the retribution they so rightfully deserved.

"She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men," said Winfrey. "For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up. Their time is up. And I just hope — I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years, and even now tormented, goes marching on."

"She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men."

We must "maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights," as a new day waits just beyond the horizon, she said.

Sounding less like an acceptance speech and more like the State of the Union for a nation desperate for hope, Winfrey's impassioned delivery underscored the raw power of the words themselves.

"I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say 'Me Too' again."

"A new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women."

If you missed it live, you'll really want to watch Winfrey's powerful speech below.

A complete transcript can be found at Harper's Bazaar.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Welp, the two skateboarding events added to the Olympics this year have wrapped up for the women's teams, and the results are historic in more ways than one.

Japan's Kokona Hiraki, age 12, just won the silver medal in women's park skateboarding, making her Japan's youngest Olympic medalist ever. Great Britain's Sky Brown, who was 12 when she qualified for the Tokyo Olympics and is now 13, won the bronze, making her Great Britain's youngest medalist ever. And those two medal wins mean that two-thirds of the six medalists in the two women's skateboarding events are age 13 or younger. (The gold and silver medalists in women's street skateboarding, Japan's Momiji Nishiya and Brazil's Rayssa Leal, are also 13.)

That's mind-blowing.

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