21 of the funniest photos from the Comedy Wildlife Awards
via Comedy Wildlife Awards

A sense of humor is a characteristic that many of us assume is only found among humans. However, according to Live Science, our primate relatives — chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans — all produce laughter-like sounds when tickled.

Koko, the gorilla that knew sign language, would tie her trainer's shoes together, sign, "chase," and then laugh.

So, who knows? Ants and spiders may share their own jokes that we have no idea about. And it'd be hard for a giraffe or puffer fish not to laugh from time to time given their looks.

Don't get me started on hyenas.


The photographers and wildlife conservationists from the Comedy and Wildlife Awards do a great job that humans aren't the only animals that enjoy having a laugh.

Every year, they hand out an award to the funniest wildlife photo and they've just released their top 44 finalists for the 2020 awards. So, we're sharing our top 21 favorites.

The winners will be announced on October 22 with the top photographer winning an incredible one-week safari with Alex Walker's Serian in the Masai Mara, Kenya as well as a unique handmade trophy from the Art Garage in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

What's your favorite photo? You can vote on the People's Choice winner on their website.

Here are 21 of our favorite finalists.

Wait up mommy, look what I got for you© Kunal Gupta / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Just chillin'© Jill Neff / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Untitled© Mark Fitzpatrick / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


It's the last day of school holidays© Max Teo / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Hide and seek© Tim Hearn / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Socially uninhibited© Martin Grace / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Boredom© Marcus Westberg / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Macaque striking a pose© Louis Marti / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


The inside joke© Femke van Willigen / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Hi y'all© Erik Fisher / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Crashing into the picture© Brigette Alclay Marcon / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Smiley© Arthur Telle Thiermann / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Social distance, please© Petr Sochmanmn / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


The race© Yevhen Samuchenko / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


So hot© Wei Ping Pen / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Monkey business© Megan Lawrenz / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


I think this tires gonna be flat© Kay Kotzian / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Peekaboo© Jagdeep Rajput / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Almost time to get up© Charlie Davidson / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


I could puke© Christina Holfelder / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.


Spreading the wildlife gosspi© Bernhard Esterer / Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2020.

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