A contest was held to find this year's funniest animal photo. Here are 15 of the best.

A hamster has to get somewhere fast. It would also like to eat some nuts, if possible. Finally, it comes up with a genius solution.

Photo by Julian Radd/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2015.

That solution, miraculously caught on camera by photographer Julian Radd, was the winner of the 2015 Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards.


The awards are the brainchild of Tanzania-based photographers Tom Sullam and Paul Joynson-Hicks, who launched the contest last year.

The pair, along with a panel of judges, run the competition in partnership with Born Free, a global animal rights group supporting anti-poaching efforts in Tanzania and around the world.

"Instead of drawing attention to wildlife through showing foxes being ripped to pieces by hounds, or a bird that’s being slashed open and it’s filled with litter, we just thought, ‘Let’s celebrate the wildlife and raise awareness that way,'" Sullam said.

This year, the group received nearly 3,000 entries. While high-quality photos can be more competitive, the contest ultimately only has one inviolable rule: Be funny.

"The humor scoring outweighs the photographic scoring," Sullam said.

Here are 15 of this year's best entries:

1. This cheetah cracking up.

Photo by Dutton Robert/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

2. These one-and-a-half owls.

Photo by Barb D'Arpino/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards.

3. This baby elephant taking a moment to collect itself on the side of the road.

Photo by Markus Pavlowsky/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

4. This field mouse on stilts.

Photo by Michael Erwin/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

5. These monkeys not fighting the feeling.

Photo by Sushil Chauhan/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

6. These puffins going diagonal.

Photo by Mary Swaby/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

7. This eagle, definitely not trying to figure out how to eat you. Not at all.

Photo by Will Saunders/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

8. This chipmunk, slowly realizing it's in over its head.

Photo by Barb D'Arpino/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

9. This seal just saying "Hey."

Photo by Adam White/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

10. This kangaroo enjoying the comforts of modern society.

Photo by Rosario Losano/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

11. This fluffy monkey, preparing a vicious sneak attack.

Photo by Nicolas de Vaulx/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

12. This odd couple, a chipmunk and a toad, experiencing a deep sensory connection.

Photo by Isabelle Marozzo/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

13. These squirrels squirreling it real hard.

Photo by Yvette Richard/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

14. This wasp with a fancier jewelry collection than you.

Photo by Murray Mcculloch/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

15. And lastly, this snowy owl, finding its bliss.

Photo by Edward Kopeschny/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2016.

Sullam says he hopes the photos, while lighthearted, reinforce the importance of protecting these animals for those who see them.

"It’s going to get the same impact," he said. "It’s just not negative."

The winners will be announced Nov. 9, 2016.

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