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'SNL' Brilliantly Skewers Sexist Super Bowl Snack Commercials With This Parody Ad

When you think of a sexist Super Bowl ad, you probably think of the over-the-top, highly sexual, objectifying ads that companies like Carls Jr. and GoDaddy often run. But those are just the most obvious culprits.

On "Saturday Night Live," Vanessa Bayer and host J.K. Simmons took aim at the slightly more subtle sexism of game-day snack commercials.

Namely, the idea that women in commercials love nothing more than making snacks for their husbands and their husband's friends who are watching the game.


Of course, there's nothing wrong with enjoying making snacks for everyone, but it's the way these ads like to portray women that's outdated.

It's like the people behind these ads think women have nothing better to do than serve microwaved snacks to their husbands.

(Divorce him. Divorce him nowwwwww.)

And even if women did want to watch the game, advertisers seem to think football is too complicated for most women to follow.

But will she understand what a quarter is?!?! Everyone knows women can't do math!

SNL's parody of these ads features a product called the "Super Bowl Activity Pack (For Women!)" that gives all the wives trapped in their kitchens in Super Bowl commercials something to do in between feeding their hungry guys.

"For women!"

You know, I wouldn't put it past some companies to actually create a product like this. Because according to most advertisers, ALL MEN love football and ALL WOMEN can't watch it because it's too hard for their tiny brains to handle. As though there's no such thing as a woman who likes football and a man who couldn't care less.

These ads want you to think that all women prefer staying in the kitchen.

And it's totally OK if you genuinely enjoy being on snack duty, but it's so rare that we see anything other than that in these ads, and that's a problem.


I swear I've heard almost this exact bit of dialogue in a commercial before.

And, of course, despite preparing all the delicious food, women aren't supposed to eat much of it.

Because that wouldn't be ladylike. Not to mention, it might make them fat. And fat women have no place in commercials, especially Super Bowl commercials, unless they're advertising how to lose weight. At least, that's the message advertisers love to send. I'm rolling my eyes so hard you can probably hear it.

These ads aren't very kind to men, either. Men are often portrayed as being annoyed and frustrated with their clueless wives.

Because in a loving and healthy relationship, you never want your significant other to share in the activities you enjoy. Right? How weird is that!?


Isn't it kind of insulting to men for ads to imply that men need women to microwave a snack for them? I'm pretty sure most men can handle something that simple. If only advertisers had that much confidence in them.

Of course, this isn't a real ad. It's just a parody.

But keep your eyes open while you're watching commercials during any sports game, and you'll start to see these tropes being used over and over again.

What can you do to change the way advertisers sell products?

If you're on Twitter, use the hashtag #NotBuyingIt to tweet at advertisers who are using sexist and outdated gender roles to sell products. The campaign has been successful at getting advertisers to change their ways, and the more people who speak up, the sooner we'll get ads that are fairer to people of all genders.

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Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy asked his Senate colleagues the questions millions of Americans have after a mass shooting.

Another school shooting. Another mass murder of innocent children. They were elementary school kids this time. There were 18 children killed—so far—this time.

The fact that I can say "this time" is enraging, but that's the routine nature of mass shootings in the U.S. It happened in Texas this time. At least three adults were killed this time. The shooter was a teenager this time.

The details this time may be different than the last time and the time before that, and the time before that, and the time before that. But there's one thing all mass shootings have in common. No, it's not mental illness. It's not racism or misogyny or religious extremism. It's not bad parenting or violent video games or lack of religion.

Some of those things have been factors in some shootings, but the single common denominator in every mass shooting is guns. That's not a secret. It's not controversial. It's fact. The only thing all mass shootings have in common is guns.

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Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

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