Heroes

She Came Here To Swap Lunches And Eat With Her BFF … And She’s All Out Of Lunches

When it comes to tearing up, everyone has their tipping point. But if you can listen to these bright-eyed, smiley kids explain exactly how they and their families make it through summer without catching a stone cold case of emotions, I commend you.

She Came Here To Swap Lunches And Eat With Her BFF … And She’s All Out Of Lunches
via schmoyoho / YouTube

If there's anything Americans need right now, it's a good laugh. In these divided times, if there is anyone who can provide one, it's "Weird Al" Yankovic.

The good news is he's back with a video that's a rare foray into American politics. Yankovic has avoided the topic throughout his career, although he did some non-partisan lampooning of the 2016 presidential debates with "Bad Hombres, Nasty Women."

In 2015, he told the Washington Times that he stays away from "sensitive" issues like "political topics. "And I don't want to divide my fan base if I can help it," he said.

"The other reason I don't do a lot of political humor is it dates pretty poorly," Yankovic said. "Things that are topical in the political arena this week would be old news a month from now, so that's probably not the kind of thing I want to have as part of my catalog."

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg not only marked the end of an illustrious life of service to law and country, but the beginning of an unprecedented judicial nomination process. While Ginsburg's spot on the Supreme Court sits open, politicians and regular Americans alike argue over whether or not it should be filled immediately, basing their arguments on past practices and partisan points.

When a Supreme Court vacancy came up in February of 2016, nine months before the election, Senate Republicans led by Mitch McConnell refused to even take up a hearing to consider President Obama's pick for the seat, arguing that it was an election year and the people should have a say in who that seat goes to.

Four years later, a mere six weeks before the election, that reasoning has gone out the window as Senate Republicans race to get a nominee pushed through the approval process prior to election day. Now, they claim, because the Senate majority and President are of the same party, it makes sense to proceed with the nomination.

Keep Reading Show less
via Katie Porter

Americans spend about $1,2000 a year on average for prescription drugs. That's more than anywhere else in the world. Private insurers and government programs pick up the bulk of the costs which we then pay through higher taxes and insurance premiums.

A major reason why Americans pay so much more than other countries is that the U.S government isn't allowed to negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies.

To better understand the underlying reasons for these astronomical prices, the U.S. House of Representatives Oversight and Reform Committee held hearings on Wednesday with current and former executives of three major drug companies.

Keep Reading Show less