One step further than buying American? Supporting a homemade industrial infrastructure.

The country music capital of the world could become the capital of something much different:

Jobs. Local ones. Good ones.

At a time when even the reconstruction of bridges in America is being outsourced to China...



via HelloGiggles

...the folks at the Nashville Fashion Alliance, a group of real American job makers, are singing a very different song.

Instead of outsourcing to overseas workers, they're establishing new infrastructure to create local jobs. In America.

And in a state that ranks 39th in unemployment in America.

From the NFA's Kickstarter:

"Over the last few years, Nashville's Fashion scene has absolutely exploded with talent. We are now home to over 150 growing fashion brands.

[The Nashville Fashion Alliance's] mission is to provide these creative companies with infrastructure, resources and support while at the same time creating needed jobs in our community."

Great mission. Good. But here's what all that mission-statement-wording means in real life.

The Nashville Fashion Alliance means a real-life, growing local industry.And that industry needs skilled workers.

They're ready to train 'em, too.

In addition to providing the infrastructure for growth, the Nashville Fashion Alliance is setting out to create a job training and placement program to sustain the job growth!

via NFA Kickstarter

I don't know about you, but that's a song I wanna hear. Over and over again.

🇺🇸 🎶 🇺🇸

If you're with me, you've got two days to give to their Kickstarter!


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