One grocery chain is dealing with unsold food in an amazing way.

Tesco's partnership with FareShare is a big step in the right direction.

Six months ago, U.K. grocery chain Tesco launched a test program, saving 50,000 meals worth of food in the process.

They partnered with FareShare, an anti-hunger organization that helps connect groups wanting to donate food with soup kitchens and food banks, and it's been a hit.


Photo via Tesco PLC/YouTube.

Here's how it works:

1. Stores set aside food that would ordinarily be thrown out.

This includes foods that have reached their "sell by" date, as well as misshapen fruit and vegetables. Instead of tossing the food out, they keep it in a bin in the back, ready for someone from a local charity to come pick it up.

2. Someone from a local charity stops by the store to pick up the food.

This is where FareShare comes in, helping pair charities with Tesco locations. The charity will get a text message from FareShare telling them there's food available. From there, they can send someone to pick up the food.

Photo via Tesco PLC/YouTube.

3. They drop the food off at their shelter, charity, food bank, or soup kitchen.

From here, the food is prepared and distributed to people in need. So simple, right?

The simplicity of that process is nothing compared to the real life impact this program is having.

Photo via Tesco PLC/YouTube.

At the Anfield Breckside Community Council, free meals are served three days a week using food from Tesco and FareShare.

It's part of a program called Food U Need, and it's helping people struggling with hunger fill their stomachs. As bills mount, even retirees and people with a full-time job find themselves unable to afford food. That's what makes Food U Need so essential: It provides food to people with no questions asked. You can just come in, sit down, and have a meal.

They accept all kinds of food and make sure nothing goes to waste.

Volunteer Peter O'Hanlon offers helps out at a recent Food U Need service. Photo via Tesco PLC/YouTube.

How's the food? You won't hear any complaints from this crowd.

Without the Liverpool-based meal program, these people would likely go hungry.

GIFs via Tesco PLC/YouTube.

The best part? The program has been so successful that Tesco is expanding the program to all 800 of their stores across the U.K.

Roughly 795 million people on earth are undernourished. While there are some big things that need to happen to solve that, one of the easiest steps we can take is to stop letting food go to waste.

Whether you're in the United Kingdom, United States, or anywhere else on Earth, there are people going hungry. The very least we can do is not waste perfectly good food, right?

Last year, France passed a law banning grocery stores from throwing away food. Instead, chains are now required to donate to charity, process into animal feed, or compost their unsold food. In the U.S., a number of organizations are testing creative solutions for hunger, including the Campus Kitchens Project, Donate Don't Dump, and Rescuing Leftover Cuisine.

It's good to see a large chain like Tesco take up this project in the U.K. Maybe it'll inspire chains around the globe to try out similar programs.

You can learn more about Tesco, FareShare, and the Anfield Breckside Community Council in the video below.

Most Shared

There are songs that tug at your heartstrings and videos that tap into your soft side. And then there are combos of the two that get you so far up in your feelings, you're not sure if you'll ever be able to climb back out.

For the millions of parents out there—especially the ones watching their babies grow up and move away from home—Michael Bublé's video for his song "Forever Now" is definitely the latter. I'm not even a Michael Bublé fan, but as a parent whose first baby just turned 19, the lyric video showing the years passing in a child's bedroom with a song about kids growing up is almost too much to take.

Wrecked, I tell you. Full-on ugly crying, with the puffy eyes and the snotty nose and everything.

I mean, just check out part of the lyrics and imagine your child's bedroom all packed into boxes:

Keep Reading Show less
Family

Andy Grammer, the pop singer and songwriter behind feel-good tunes like "Keep Your Head Up," "Back Home," and "Don't Give Up on Me," has a new album out—and it is seriously fabulous. Titled simply "Naive," Grammer says it's "all about how seeing the good in todays world can feel like a rebellious act."

"I wrote this album for the light bringers," Grammer shared on Facebook. "The people who choose to see the good even in the overwhelming chaos of the bad. The smilers who fight brick by brick to build an authentic smile everyday, even when it seems like an impossible thing to do. For those who have been marginalized as 'sweet' or 'cute' or 'less powerful' for being overly positive. To me optimism is a war to be fought, possibly the most important one. If I am speaking to you and you are relating to it then know I made this album for you. You are my tribe. I love you and I hope it serves you. Don't let the world turn down your shine, we all so badly need it."

Reading that, it's easy to think maybe he really is naive, but Grammer's positivity isn't due to nothing difficult ever happening in his life. His mom, Kathy, died of breast cancer when Grammer was 25. He and his mother were very close, and her life and death had a huge impact on him.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

There are reasonable arguments to be had on all sides of America's debates about guns.

Then there are NRA lobbyists.

According to the Tampa Bay Times, Florida National Rifle Association lobbyist Marion Hammer spoke to state economists last week to explain why a proposed assault weapons ban would devastate gun manufacturers in the state. The proposed amendment, which is being led by the aunt of a student killed in the Parkland school shooting, would ban the future sale of assault rifles in Florida and mandate that current owners either register their guns with the state or give them up.

The back and forth between those proposing and opposing the amendment appears to be a pretty typical gun legislation debate. Only this time, the NRA lobbyist pulled out one of the most bizarre arguments I've seen yet.

Keep Reading Show less
Democracy

Graphic helps identify what triggers you emotionally in relationships

Knowing your triggers helps you manage your emotions.

via Blessing Manifesting / Instagram

Learning your emotional triggers on your own is one thing but figuring out your triggers in a relationship adds another layer of intensity. Maybe you're afraid of being abandoned or want to feel the need to push the other person away but you don't know why.

If this sounds familiar, you're not alone. It's why artist and mental health advocate Dominee Wyrick created a graphic to help you identify what triggers you in relationships.

Keep Reading Show less
Well Being