Heroes

Obama just made a milestone move on coal power plants. Here's why it's so important.

Did you know coal plants are responsible for more CO2 pollution than all the passenger vehicles in the United States?

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League of Conservation Voters

President Obama recently launched a new plan to fight climate change, state by state.

Climate Desk's Tim McDonnell (scroll down for the video) says this is the single biggest step toward limiting climate change that any president has ever taken. And Obama is doing it by creating a new set of rules for the biggest industrial contributor to global warming in the United States — coal-fired power plants.

Why is Obama's new plan on coal important?


Obama unveiled his energy plan at the White House on Aug. 3, 2015. Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

Emissions. You know, the stuff that causes global warming.

Until now, the fossil fuel industry didn't have any cap on emissions, which, you know, could be a bit of problem in the long run.

Now Obama wants to introduce a plan to help keep global warming at bay.

Coal-fired power plants are the biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions in our country.

According to Climate Desk, coal plants are responsible for more CO2 pollution than all the passenger vehicles in the United States.

That seems like something we should be on top of, humanity. What were we doing before Obama enacted these new rules?

There were no national limits on coal-fired power plant emissions.

In the United States, these types of emissions were unlimited until Obama launched the plan. Whoa.

Now, each state has targets for how to reduce emissions from these plants.

The new plan will regulate the emissions from coal plants. An impressive (but could-get-more-impressive) 64% of Americans support more stringent emissions regulations on coal-fueled power plants.

Learn more about the plan here:

What will that mean? Less CO2 emissions and more sustainable energy plans. Awesome. But there's more than just coal. Here's a petition you can sign to stop arctic drilling, too.

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