Mom-of-five's anti-vax argument gets taken down with a masterfully-crafted burn.
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Humans first started using vaccines hundreds of years ago in order to stave off early death and improve public health.

While there are numerous studies showing just how beneficial vaccines are for longevity, and protecting the masses from fatal infections, the past few years has seen a major growth in the anti-vaxxer movement.

The reasons parents choose to not vaccinate their children run the gamut, one widely held stance among anti-vaxxers is the idea that vaccines are inherently dangerous and harbor potential side effects far more dangerous than the diseases they fight.


Others have bought into the debunked myth that vaccines cause autism (which speaks volumes about stigma against ASD), also, some are so inclined towards natural or new age health routines that the concept of modern medicine is a dangerous affront.

While most personal beliefs are just that, a personal belief that largely affects your own life, being anti-vaxxer fully poses a public health risk. Because of this, people are often quick to call out anti-vaxxers for the harm they're causing their communities.

So, when a mom of five recently posted about how she doesn't need vaccines because she believes Jesus will protect her kids, a commenter was quick to flay her to

via Imgur

This burn was so good I'm pretty sure it sent the whole thread to heaven, or perhaps, more accurately to hell.

Because grown adults denying their kids access to life-saving medicine is a true marker of hell on earth.

This article was originally published by our partners at someeecards.

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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.