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Michael Brown's Mother Has One Request. Here Are 5 Reasons Why We Should Honor It.

Michael Brown's parents have asked that every police officer working the streets in this country wear a body camera. Here are just five reasons why they're right:

Michael Brown's Mother Has One Request. Here Are 5 Reasons Why We Should Honor It.

1. On-body cameras lower citizen complaints and use of force by police.

Police taking action against Gazi Park protestors June 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey.


When police in Rialto, California, wore body cameras, citizen complaints dropped by 88%. Use of force by those officers declined by 59%. Police in Mesa, Arizona, tried them out too, and a one-year study found that in the first 8 months, officers without the cameras had almost 3 times the complaints as officers who wore them. Those who wore them had 40% fewer complaints than they did during the prior year when they weren't wearing cameras.

2. People don't trust the police.

In communities across the U.S., according to a recent poll, 50% of all people believe that law enforcement officers are not held accountable for misconduct. That number rises when you look specifically at a community of color: 64% for Hispanics and 66% for African-Americans.

This same study revealed that 88% of people support recording the police.

3. Police chiefs think body cameras are a good idea.

Police executives interviewed for a study by a nonprofit research group overwhelmingly agreed that body-worn cameras reduce complaints against officers and approve of them for that reason. “We actually encourage our officers to let people know that theyare recording,” said Police Chief Ken Miller of Greensboro, North Carolina. “Why? Because we think that it elevates behavioron both sides of the camera.”

4. And so does the ACLU.

Although the American Civil Liberties Union generally takes a "dim view" of more surveillance of American life, they think police on-body cameras are different because of their potential to check the abuse of power by police officers. In their words:

"When cameras primarily serve the function of allowing public monitoring of the government instead of the other way around, we generally regard that as a good thing. ... Overall, we think they can be a win-win — but only if they are deployed within a framework of strong policies to ensure they protect the public without becoming yet another system for routine surveillance of the public."

5. Too many lives have been lost due to too little accountability. Body cameras would help change that.

Here are just a few names of the hundreds and hundreds of men, many of them young and the majority of them of color, who have recently lost their lives at the hands of police and where no accountability was found:

Tamir Rice, Cleveland, Ohio, November 2014

Ezell Ford, Los Angeles, August 2014

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri, August 2014

John Crawford, Beaverford, Ohio, August 2014

Akai Gurley, Brooklyn, New York, November 2014

Levar Jones, Columbia, South Carolina, November 2014

Eric Garner, Staten Island, New York, July 2014

Trayvon Martin, Sanford, Florida, February 2012

Kimani Gary, Brooklyn, New York, March 2013

Kendrec McDade, Pasadena, California, March 2012

Timothy Russell, Cleveland, Ohio, December 2012

Ervin Jefferson, Atlanta, Georgia, March 2012

Amadou Diallo, New York City, February 1999

and many others...

Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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The fasting period of Ramadan observed by Muslims around the world is a both an individual and communal observance. For the individual, it's a time to grow closer to God through sacrifice and detachment from physical desires. For the community, it's a time to gather in joy and fellowship at sunset, breaking bread together after abstaining from food and drink since sunrise.

The COVID-19 pandemic has limited group gatherings in many countries, putting a damper on the communal part of Ramadan. But for one community in Barcelona, Spain, a different faith has stepped up to make the after sunset meal, known as Iftar, as safe as possible for the Muslim community.

According to Reuters, Father Peio Sanchez, Santa Anna's rector, has opened the doors of the Catholic church's open-air cloisters to local Muslims to use for breaking the Ramadan fast. He sees the different faiths coming together as a symbol of civic coexistence.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less