Luke Perry shared how one attitude adjustment helped him overcome 256 rejections and get his first real acting job.

The world is mourning the death of an icon who lived and breathed ‘90s cool with the passing of Luke Perry at the age of 52.

Perry passed away four days after suffering a massive stroke.

He shot to stardom in 1990 as Dylan McKay on “Beverly Hills 902010." McKay was a bad-boy surfer with an intellectual streak whose soft-spoken intensity was reminiscent of James Dean.


via Alan Light / Flickr

Although he could never truly shake the McKay character, Perry worked consistently after “90210” left the airwaves in 2000. From 2016 until his passing, Perry starred as Archie Andrews’ father on the CW’s “Riverdale” and he's slated to appear in Quentin Tarantino's "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" which is set for a July release.

In Hollywood, it takes a lot more than talent to make it to the top. If you don’t have the connections, you’ve got to have tenacity and Perry’s was legendary.

In a satellite radio interview posted to YouTube by Sway’s Universe in 2013, Perry shared how his tenacity mixed with cultivating a take-it-or-leave-it attitude helped him overcome 256 rejections and land his role on “90210.”

(Skip ahead to 5:15 to hear the discussion.)

I just kept thinking, I just walked out of a room full of fools. Those people have no idea and you gotta keep telling yourself that because you gotta get back in the room. It's like a horse. You fall of you've gotta keep getting back on. ...

I was really starting to get quite a bit of an attitude at the end. Let’s say audition 250, I just walked in I’m going, ‘I know you’re gonna say no, just say it quickly so I can get to the next place.’

I knew everybody was going to turn me down, so I’m starting to get pissed off about it. And when I came in not expecting anything other than to be asked to leave, they sort of took notice of that and it changed the nature of the work I was doing.

I wasn't going in trying to be the guy they wanted. I said, 'Here's what I do and if you want this, you call me. If you don't want this you call somebody else. And I'm out.'

That enabled me to have the confidence to go in and it allowed me to feel like I was doing my work. I wasn't trying to serve whatever idea they thought it was and that's how I got 90210 and that's what Aaron [Spelling] responded to. I wasn't trying to do it like everyone else. I just said, ‘This is what I do — yes, no — I don’t care.’
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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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