It's not that 'Mad Max' cleaned up at the Oscars that matters. It's who won.

"Mad Max: Fury Road" roared into the Oscars with a near-sweep of the night's biggest technical categories.

Mark Mangini and David White, winners for Best Sound Editing. Photo by Mark Ralston/Getty Images.


It was a huge win for one of the year's most innovative, critically-acclaimed, and all-around badass movies.

"Fury Road" deserves all the awards ever for putting women front and center on camera.

GIF from "Mad Max: Fury Road."

But the best part of all the acceptance speeches? Seeing how many amazing women worked on it behind the camera.

Like Jenny Beavan, who won for Best Costume Design.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

Lisa Thompson, who (co-)won for Best Production Design.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

Elka Wardega and Lesley Vanderwalt, who (co-)won for Best Makeup and Hairstyling.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

And Margaret Sixel, who won for best editing.

Photo by Mark Ralston/Getty Images.

Sixel is married to "Fury Road" director George Miller, and the story of how she got the job is ... kind of amazing:

"Margaret Sixel initially turned her husband down, asking, 'Why do you want me to do an action film?'" Miller told the Huffington Post back in May.

"'Because if a guy did it, it would look like every other action movie," he replied.

That's how a truly great and innovative movie gets made — by hiring the people who don't ordinarily get asked.

Hollywood is generally pretty terrible at placing women in prominent behind-the-scenes roles. As a result, movies are being made by pretty much the same people who have always made them.

It might explain why there are so many bad movies.

"Fury Road" did the opposite — and got amazing results for it. Why do its action sequences pop? A woman, one who had never worked on an action movie before, edited them. Why does the script do so right by its female characters? Eve Ensler, author of "The Vagina Monologues," consulted on the script.

Seeing all those women up there on the Oscars stage sends a powerful message to young, aspiring filmmakers that creativity knows no gender, and neither does rising to the top of your craft.

A movie like "Fury Road" could only have been made by men and women working together, merging their diverse experiences to create something new, innovative, and thrilling.

GIF by "Mad Max: Fury Road."

Enjoy the after-party, ladies and dudes. You earned it.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

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In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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via Beto el Curioso / YouTube

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Jeanne Pouchain, 58, who lives in the village of St. Joseph, near Lyon, had a rude awakening three years ago when she received a letter from the Lyon court of appeals declaring that her family members need to pay the money she allegedly owed.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.