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How Long Are We Going To Keep Feeding The Gay Vs. Christian 'Controversy'?

As a gay rights activist and Christian, it was really hard to watch the recent video of Dan Savage (founder of the pro-gay It Gets Better Project) speak to an auditorium of high schoolers who started walking out when he said some harsh things about the Bible. In fact, watching this video made me feel extremely anxious.

How Long Are We Going To Keep Feeding The Gay Vs. Christian 'Controversy'?

What I see in this video, particularly at 2:45, is a man who has been deeply wounded ("on the receiving end of beatings" were his exact words) by people who claim to follow the same religion that I do. Watch:




It seems to me that the real "pansy ass" in this situation is a media that is obsessed with manufacturing a Gay Vs. Christian "controversy." The adults play out this inane battle, using our kids as pawns by presenting them with a false choice: you can either be Christian OR you can accept and love LGBTQ folks — but you can't do both.

The Jesus that I — and many of my fellow Christians — follow wouldn't have walked out of that auditorium. He would have embraced Dan Savage and called him "Brother." It seems that neither Dan nor any of those kids have ever been introduced to that kind of Jesus, which is perhaps the saddest part of this whole story. Because that lack of perspective is precisely what keeps us all locked into this vicious circle of fear, hate, and discrimination.

Clearly Savage shouldn't have said "bullshit" in a high-school context or called the kids "pansy asses" no matter how badly he's been hurt himself. However, his resulting public apology was a perfect example of how to ask for grace — a truly Christian concept — which is something that we Christians could learn from.
















It's high time that Christians follow Dan's example by publicly apologizing for the emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual abuse we have caused our LGBTQ brothers and sisters. It's high time to start telling the truth that Biblical verses used to vilify homosexuality have been taken out of their historical context and simply aren't applicable to the modern-day reality of homosexual relationships. It’s high time the media starts amplifying the voices of moderate and liberal Christians who DO NOT believe that homosexuality is a sin and who welcome, honor, love, support, and respect the LGBTQ community just as they are.

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The past year has changed the way a lot of people see the world and brought the importance of global change to the forefront. However, even social impact entrepreneurs have had to adapt to the changing circumstances brought on by the Coronavirus pandemic.

"The first barrier is lack of funding. COVID-19 has deeply impacted many of our supporters, and we presume it will continue to do so. Current market volatility has caused many of our supporters to scale back or withdraw their support altogether," said Brisa de Angulo, co-founder of A Breeze of Hope Foundation, a non-profit that prevents childhood sexual violence in Bolivia and winner of the 2020 Elevate Prize.

To help social entrepreneurs scale their impact for the second year in a row, The Elevate Prize is awarding $5 million to 10 innovators, activists, and problem–solvers who are making a difference in their communities every day.

"We want to see extraordinary people leading high-impact projects that are elevating opportunities for all people, elevating issues and their solutions, or elevating understanding of and between people," The Elevate Prize website states.

Founded in 2019 by entrepreneur and philanthropist Joseph Deitch, The Elevate Prize is dedicated to giving unsung social entrepreneurs the necessary resources to scale their impact and to ultimately help inspire and awaken the hero in all of us.

"The Elevate Prize remains committed to finding a radically diverse group of innovative problem solvers and investing unconventional and personalized resources that bring greater visibility to them as leaders and the vital work they do. We make good famous," said Carolina García Jayaram, executive director, Elevate Prize Foundation.

The application process will take place in two phases. Applicants have till May 5 for Phase 1, which will include a short written application. A select number of those applicants will then be chosen for Phase 2, which includes a more robust set of questions later this summer. Ten winners will be announced in October 2021.

In addition to money, winners will also receive support from The Elevate Prize to help amplify their mission, achieve their goals, and receive mentorship and industry connections.

Last year, 1,297 candidates applied for the prize.

The 10 winners include Simprints, a UK-based nonprofit implementing biometric solutions to give people in the developing world hope and access to a better healthcare system; ReThink, a patented, innovative app that detects offensive messages and gives users a chance to reconsider posting them; and Guitars Over Guns, an organization bridging the opportunity gap for youth from vulnerable communities through transformational access to music, connectivity, and self-empowerment.

You can learn more about last year's winners, here.

If you know of someone or you yourself are ready to scale your impact, apply here today.

via SoHu

One of the strangest weddings in human history happened on May 31 in China's Jiangsu province. A woman was marrying off her son when she realized something unbelievably familiar about his wife-to-be.

She had a birthmark that was identical to the one that her daughter had. Unfortunately, she lost her daughter as a baby and never found her again.

So, the woman asked one of the most uncomfortable questions ever to the bride's parents: "Did you, by any chance, adopt your daughter?"

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RODNAE Productions via Pexels
True

The past year has changed the way a lot of people see the world and brought the importance of global change to the forefront. However, even social impact entrepreneurs have had to adapt to the changing circumstances brought on by the Coronavirus pandemic.

"The first barrier is lack of funding. COVID-19 has deeply impacted many of our supporters, and we presume it will continue to do so. Current market volatility has caused many of our supporters to scale back or withdraw their support altogether," said Brisa de Angulo, co-founder of A Breeze of Hope Foundation, a non-profit that prevents childhood sexual violence in Bolivia and winner of the 2020 Elevate Prize.

To help social entrepreneurs scale their impact for the second year in a row, The Elevate Prize is awarding $5 million to 10 innovators, activists, and problem–solvers who are making a difference in their communities every day.

"We want to see extraordinary people leading high-impact projects that are elevating opportunities for all people, elevating issues and their solutions, or elevating understanding of and between people," The Elevate Prize website states.

Founded in 2019 by entrepreneur and philanthropist Joseph Deitch, The Elevate Prize is dedicated to giving unsung social entrepreneurs the necessary resources to scale their impact and to ultimately help inspire and awaken the hero in all of us.

"The Elevate Prize remains committed to finding a radically diverse group of innovative problem solvers and investing unconventional and personalized resources that bring greater visibility to them as leaders and the vital work they do. We make good famous," said Carolina García Jayaram, executive director, Elevate Prize Foundation.

The application process will take place in two phases. Applicants have till May 5 for Phase 1, which will include a short written application. A select number of those applicants will then be chosen for Phase 2, which includes a more robust set of questions later this summer. Ten winners will be announced in October 2021.

In addition to money, winners will also receive support from The Elevate Prize to help amplify their mission, achieve their goals, and receive mentorship and industry connections.

Last year, 1,297 candidates applied for the prize.

The 10 winners include Simprints, a UK-based nonprofit implementing biometric solutions to give people in the developing world hope and access to a better healthcare system; ReThink, a patented, innovative app that detects offensive messages and gives users a chance to reconsider posting them; and Guitars Over Guns, an organization bridging the opportunity gap for youth from vulnerable communities through transformational access to music, connectivity, and self-empowerment.

You can learn more about last year's winners, here.

If you know of someone or you yourself are ready to scale your impact, apply here today.