How can we harness technology to create a more sustainable and equitable world?
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This article was produced in partnership with the United Nations to launch the biggest-ever global conversation on the role of cooperation in building the future we want. Share your voice by taking the 1-minute UN75 survey.

Technology can be—and has been—used in ways that both help and harm humanity. On the up side, advancements in digital technologies have been a huge factor in making progress on world-changing initiatives like the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals. On the downside, the misuse of technology can threaten privacy, erode individual and collective security, and fuel inequalities.

How can we harness and develop digital tools that can help us create a more sustainable and equitable world? How do we weigh the risks and opportunities of technological revolutions in global health, social media, work, and data? How can we manage technology in ways that bridge the gap between the future we want and where we are currently headed?

As part of the UN's 75th anniversary, we asked individuals and organizations to join us in a Leap Day #UpChat on Twitter to discuss these questions and how we can make leaps in technology work for us all. Here are some highlights from the enlightening, informative, and inspiring discussion.

Q1: Technology can be a great equalizer. How has it been used to improve humanity?






Q2. Which organizations or individuals are using technology for good?




Q3. How has your organization used technology to drive success towards the SDGs?





Q4: In a world of fake news, data security issues, and the darker side of social media (read: trolls), how do you stay motivated?






Q5: Misinformation is more prevalent than ever. What are your recommendations on how to address the issue?




Q6: Throughout history, technological revolutions have changed the labor force. How will it impact the future of work in the next decade?






Q7: What responsibilities do businesses and governments have as they increasingly have more access to our personal data?


Q8. What does a digital future for all look like?






Q9. How have you seen youth influence the way we use digital technology?



Q10: With the future of technology in mind, do you think that people in 2045 will be better off, worse off, or the same as you are today?



If you'd like to join our next UpChat or see previous chats on global issues, follow us on Twitter and check out @JoinUN75. You can also let your voice be heard with the UN's public survey here.

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