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Unbelievable feats humanity will accomplish before giving women equal pay

Set your calendar reminders and your time-travel clocks, gals!

Unbelievable feats humanity will accomplish before giving women equal pay

Let's take a look at the link between technology and women's rights, shall we?

I bet this one still hurts to walk in! Image via "The Daily Show."


We human beings have figured out a way to print stuff — from guns to prosthetic limbs, art, and jewelry, just to name a few. Seriously! We're so smart!

Scientists even predict that within 10 years, they'll be able to 3D-print a functioning human heart.

Whoa. Welcome to the future. Image via Giphy.

But we still haven't figured out equal rights? Is that possible?

As Kristen Schaal explains in the "The Daily Show" clip below, we're not using our genius brains to their full potential. That is, using them to make society more fair.

We still won't have closed the pay gap for women, where a lady earns less than a dude for doing the exact same work, until (and this is an estimate, of course) the year 2058.

Um, that's not gonna work. Image via will3boy.

Yep. That means that we'll have a lot of people walking around with insta-printed hearts but unequal lives.

Super weird.

If we're going to have flying cars in 2017...

GIF via "The Daily Show."

...and put a person on Mars by 2030...

GIF via "The Daily Show."

...we can definitely put our smarty brains together and figure out this whole a-dollar-for-him-is-the-same-as-a-dollar-for-her thing before 2058!

If we can basically develop a vending machine for human organs, we can crack this equality thing.

I totally believe in us.


We. Can. Do. This. (In fewer than 43 years!) Image via Giphy.

So how about we try using our powers for equality so that we don't have a lotta unequal people walking around with printed hearts?

I'll print that!

Comedian and "Daily Show" correspondent Kristen Schaal helps Jon Stewart understand the numbers:

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

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gray steel 3-door refrigerator near modular kitchen

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Reusable Silicone Baking Cups



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Amazon Basics, $7.99 for a pack of 12; Amazon

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Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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