More

Unbelievable feats humanity will accomplish before giving women equal pay

Set your calendar reminders and your time-travel clocks, gals!

Unbelievable feats humanity will accomplish before giving women equal pay

Let's take a look at the link between technology and women's rights, shall we?

I bet this one still hurts to walk in! Image via "The Daily Show."


We human beings have figured out a way to print stuff — from guns to prosthetic limbs, art, and jewelry, just to name a few. Seriously! We're so smart!

Scientists even predict that within 10 years, they'll be able to 3D-print a functioning human heart.

Whoa. Welcome to the future. Image via Giphy.

But we still haven't figured out equal rights? Is that possible?

As Kristen Schaal explains in the "The Daily Show" clip below, we're not using our genius brains to their full potential. That is, using them to make society more fair.

We still won't have closed the pay gap for women, where a lady earns less than a dude for doing the exact same work, until (and this is an estimate, of course) the year 2058.

Um, that's not gonna work. Image via will3boy.

Yep. That means that we'll have a lot of people walking around with insta-printed hearts but unequal lives.

Super weird.

If we're going to have flying cars in 2017...

GIF via "The Daily Show."

...and put a person on Mars by 2030...

GIF via "The Daily Show."

...we can definitely put our smarty brains together and figure out this whole a-dollar-for-him-is-the-same-as-a-dollar-for-her thing before 2058!

If we can basically develop a vending machine for human organs, we can crack this equality thing.

I totally believe in us.


We. Can. Do. This. (In fewer than 43 years!) Image via Giphy.

So how about we try using our powers for equality so that we don't have a lotta unequal people walking around with printed hearts?

I'll print that!

Comedian and "Daily Show" correspondent Kristen Schaal helps Jon Stewart understand the numbers:

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.