There are few things in life as relaxing as cuddling up with a good book.

And it's even better with a classic novel, right? But classics can sometimes be ... kind of funny.

In a hilarious series of comics, illustrator John Atkinson gives us some less-than-classic descriptions of the classic books you probably had to read in high school.

In 1926, The New York Times described Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" as "a truly gripping story, told in a lean, hard, athletic narrative prose that puts more literary English to shame."


Atkinson's description? "Lost generation gets drunk. They're still lost."

Yeah, he gets it.

Here are some of his favorite versions of the abridged classics:

Of course, classics are classics for a reason.

Many of these books are timeless favorites. We love them and many of us will read them repeatedly. But having a laugh about the things we enjoy can totally be good for the soul.

This week, a Supreme Court ruling has acknowledged that, at least for the sake of federal criminal prosecutions, most of the eastern half of Oklahoma belongs to the Muscogee (Creek) Indian Tribe. The ruling enforces treaties made in the 19th century, despite objections from state and federal governments, and upholds the sovereignty of the Muscogee to prosecute crimes committed by tribe members within their own lands.

The U.S. government has a long and storied history of breaking treaties with Native American tribes, and Indigenous communities have suffered greatly because of those broken promises.

Stacy Leeds, a former Cherokee Nation Supreme Court justice and former special district court judge for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, described the ruling in an article on Slate:

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