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Her brother thought sex position jokes were funny, so she turns the joke on its own sexist self.

I want to hear more of these, STAT.

sexism, comedy, equality, gender
Image pulled from YouTube video.

Ever heard the joke about the woman pirate?

You know those "funny" sexual position jokes?

Comedian Liz Miele talks about how all those jokes have one thing in common — and then makes a few jokes of her own.

Here's an example of one to get it started:

"Position #1 is a dude going down on a woman. She squirts in his face. He learns to respect women. It's called the 19th Amendment."

Maybe a bit of a crude joke, but all too familiar except being told from the other side of the gender story.


I had the opportunity for a little bit of a Q and A with Liz and her brother, Sam, about this experience. Here are the best parts:

Has your brother ever unknowingly said anything a little sexist? How did you react to that?

Liz:My brother is an incredibly kind, thoughtful, smart, caring, funny, weird dude! His M.O. isn't to hurt or offend anyone, but he's also 21.

I think this new trend of jumping down people's throats when they say one thing wrong is a deep disservice to all of us. Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone says stuff they didn't know would be hurtful.

"Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone says stuff they didn't know would be hurtful."

The true nature of a person is what they do with that info after they are told how it made them feel or why its not OK to say. Every time I've been open with my brother about something he said that hurt me, he's always listened, asked questions if he didn't understand, apologized, and did his best the next time the issue came up. I wasn't that mature at 21, and I know few people that open and mature now! He is an incredible person.

What was the real-life reaction to writing this set about Sam's joke-telling?

Liz: My brother is very supportive, so he heard the very early stages when it was just a story about what had happened and one feminist sex position, and he thought it was funny and actually gave me the idea for position number two. And I thought, "Well, I have two. I'll write one more, and I have a joke!"

I always give him credit when people ask about the joke. He's one of the smartest, funniest people I know.

And Sam, are you more mindful now?

Sam: I dig this joke my sister wrote. I think it's crafty and inventive, and most of all hilarious. I'm so happy to see it receive all this attention. She has been badass and funny for too long, and she is long overdue for some notoriety. I'm especially enthused that this joke in particular has received so much attention because I helped write the funniest line, which is quite the feather in my cap.

"I dig this joke my sister wrote. I think it's crafty and inventive and most of all hilarious."

As far as being more mindful about how people react to jokes these kinds of jokes, I've always been somewhat mindful of how someone is going to react to what I say. I just find people's reactions far funnier than the joke itself, which at times gets me in trouble or spawns a brilliant joke, so I call it a win-win. Poop!

I don't know about you, but I'd say Liz's feminist sex jokes are even funner — and sexier — than the old ones.

If you would like to see some of her comedy about it, watch just below:


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