Helen Mirren is 'flattered' to have been mistaken for Keanu Reeves' new girlfriend
via Newsy People / Twitter

The internet was ablaze after notoriously private actor Keanu Reeves, 55, walked the red carpet at the LACMA Art + Film Gala on Saturday with his new girlfriend, artist Alexandra Grant, 46.

It was refreshing to see a man in Hollywood dating a woman who's age-appropriate. Older actors are notorious for being with women half their age.




Most recently, Dennis Quaid, 65, turned heads after announcing his engagement to Laura Savoie, 26.


People are also happy to see that Grant has no problems being seen in public with her natural, gray hair.


People magazine confirmed they are dating. "Keanu wants to openly share his life with her," a source told People. "He is extremely happy and grateful to have Alex in his life."

RELATED: Keanu Reeves has a new girlfriend and *gasp* she's age-appropriate

The couple are the co-founders of X Artists' Books, a publishing house that focuses on publishing "thoughtful, high-quality, artist-centered books that fit within and between genres."

People who are unfamiliar with Grant thought Reeves was dating actress Dame Hellen Mirren, 76 — a pairing that would have been a real rarity in Hollywood, an actor dating a woman 20 years his senior.

That probably hasn't happened since Burt Reynolds dated Dinah Shore dated back in the '70s.




Mirren was asked about the mix-up on Wednesday at the premiere of her new movie, "The Good Liar," in New York City.

RELATED: Keanu Reeves is the nicest person, and there are the receipts to prove it

"I saw that," Mirren said, according to ET Online. "That was very flattering on me, you know, because she's obviously lovely."

Although they aren't dating, Mirren said she knows Reeves because he worked with her husband of 22 years, Taylor Hackford, who directed him in 1997's "The Devil's Advocate."

"I do know Keanu very well. He did a film with my husband and he is just the most adorable, lovely person," Mirren said. "So she's a lucky girl and I'm sure that he's a lucky boy."

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

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