More

Have you heard about what's happening on April 15? Because it's not just Tax Day.

The biggest protest ever to raise the wage is happening on April 15. And Upworthy is covering it all day.

Have you heard about what's happening on April 15? Because it's not just Tax Day.

On April 15, 2015, fast-food workers, child care workers, airport workers, and even adjunct professors are joining together all across the United States.

Minimum-wage workers will protest in various cities in the U.S. (and the world!).

They started organizing in November 2012 with only 200 workers in New York City. That grew to over 150 cities and thousands of minimum-wage workers in 2013. In 2014, the thing went global, with actions in 33 countries across six continents.


And what happens in 2015 ... that's up to everybody who participates!

What do they want? A livable wage of $15 an hour and a union. When do they want it? As soon as humanly possible. That's what the Fight for $15 is all about!

So, like, yesterday would be nice.

See, these employees want to make enough to live, not just scrape by.

These are actual fast-food strikers who are living on the minimum wage. Note that they aren't just bored teenagers trying to make a little extra money to pay for Pokemon cards or whatever it is that teenagers are into these days. They are adults.

I just checked my watch and it's minimum-wage fact-o'clock, so let's get real:

  • At a whopping 75%, adults are the majority of minimum-wage earners.
  • At least 70% of those minimum-wage-earning adults have a high school degree or some college under their belts.
  • The majority of adults making minimum wage? Adult women, at 48.5%.

Here's some fancy pie charts to illustrate this point further, just in case you're into pie. Or charts.

Just like this, but tastier and full of facts about the minimum wage. Mmm.

McDonald's made some progress here when it announced a raise for employees earlier this year. But it's not enough.

This might sound like cause for celebration. But what you might not have heard is ... that raise? Well, it's only for corporate workers, not the fast-food crew working down at your local McD's.

Only 10% of McDonald's employees will actually see that raise on their paychecks. That means roughly 1.6 million people will see a remarkable increase of zero whole dollars, folks.

Like, whoa, McDonald's, slow it down with your tons and tons of generosity you've got going on right now, am I right?

So on April 15, people are joining together in the biggest protest yet to demand more ... in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Atlanta, and maybe even your town (if you're not from the previously listed ones, of course).

And Upworthy is going to cover the entire thing. On Twitter. And from the ground. All day.

And we want you to be there with us.

Watch the @Upworthy Twitter account on Wednesday, April 15, 2015, to see live updates of the protests as they happen.

We'll be talking to folks on the ground as well as giving you the rundown with a slew of smart, labor-focused partners on why this is so, so important right now. We might even do a little Q&A in the middle of it all, just like a regular ol' #UpChat. You remember those, right? Those are fun.

Join us Wednesday, April 15, 2015, for the Fight for 15 protests. #RaiseTheWage

The fasting period of Ramadan observed by Muslims around the world is a both an individual and communal observance. For the individual, it's a time to grow closer to God through sacrifice and detachment from physical desires. For the community, it's a time to gather in joy and fellowship at sunset, breaking bread together after abstaining from food and drink since sunrise.

The COVID-19 pandemic has limited group gatherings in many countries, putting a damper on the communal part of Ramadan. But for one community in Barcelona, Spain, a different faith has stepped up to make the after sunset meal, known as Iftar, as safe as possible for the Muslim community.

According to Reuters, Father Peio Sanchez, Santa Anna's rector, has opened the doors of the Catholic church's open-air cloisters to local Muslims to use for breaking the Ramadan fast. He sees the different faiths coming together as a symbol of civic coexistence.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less