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Harry Styles stopped his concert to answer a fan's dating question and it was simply great
'Tina, she's gay!': Harry Styles helped a fan come out to her mom in spectacular fashion.

No stranger to being an advocate for treating people with kindness, gentleman heartthrob Harry Styles gave some straightforward dating advice mid-concert that left female fans feeling empowered.

During his Love On Tour stop in Detroit, Styles found a fan holding a sign that read, "Should I text him?" which received boos among the crowd. However, in typical Harry fashion, his reply was simply, "is he nice to you?"

You can watch the full video here:



He concluded with, "My personal opinion is that if there's any sort of games, trash, trash, trash, not for you," a piece of advice that resulted in raucous applause and a flood of tweets from fans.

This is more than your run-of-the-mill fan-girling. There's plenty of evidence out there that shows Harry Styles has been a champion for feminism in a way that few men have succeeded. And that goes far beyond his fashion choices.

Take for instance in 2014 when he joined the #HeForShe movement in supporting gender equality.

Or in 2017, when he wore T-shirt that bearing the slogan "Women are smarter."



Or my personal favorite, in 2017 when Harry had his Rolling Stones interview, and was quick to defend his fanbase.

"Young girls like the Beatles. You gonna tell me they're not serious? How can you say young girls don't get it? They're our future. Our future doctors, lawyers, mothers, presidents, they kind of keep the world going. Teenage-girl fans—they don't lie. If they like you, they're there. They don't act 'too cool.' They like you, and they tell you. Which is sick."

It's no wonder why some dub him the "Feminist Prince." And with his special brand of sincerity and charm that encourages women to step into their own power...long may he reign.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

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