Harry Styles perfectly explains why mocking teen girls' music taste is stupid.

Teen girls.

Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images.

Their taste in music is crazy and inscrutable, what with their boy bands and their InstaSnapTunes and their Eds Sheeran.

One Ed Sheeran. Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP.


Should they get off our lawns?

Photo via iStock.

Not according to teen heartthrob Harry Styles, who came through with a stirring defense of his young female fans in interview with Rolling Stone.

The question? Whether he'll ever ditch his teen-friendly stylings to seek out "credibility" with a more serious audience.

Styles thinks not — and furthermore, shut up forever.

"Who's to say that young girls who like pop music – short for popular, right? – have worse musical taste than a 30-year-old hipster guy? That's not up to you to say. Music is something that's always changing. There's no goal posts.

Young girls like the Beatles. You gonna tell me they're not serious? How can you say young girls don't get it? They're our future. Our future doctors, lawyers, mothers, presidents, they kind of keep the world going.

Teenage-girl fans – they don't lie. If they like you, they're there. They don't act 'too cool.' They like you, and they tell you. Which is sick."



Harry Styles. Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP.

It's not that teenage girls like bad music. It's that idiots label a lot of good music bad because young girls like it.

Consider, as Styles urges, The Beatles.

Will these teen idols ever be credible? Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images.

The Beatles didn't just magically become a good band when they wrote "Revolver."

Those screaming teen girls with posters of The Fab Four on their bedroom walls that everyone made fun of? They were on to something way before their older brothers were wasting countless hours getting high on oregano fumes and spinning "Revolution #9" diagonally.

(Not that it needs to be said, but "I Want to Hold Your Hand" is a way better song than "Revolution #9." Don't @ me).

This tendency to dismiss things teen girls like isn't restricted to music, either!

Remember when everyone was surprised that Teen Vogue was doing good journalism? That was because people couldn't believe it was possible that a magazine for "vapid" 12-year-old girls could have anything "real" to say.

Also, remember when Cosmopolitan's hard hitting interview with Ivanka Trump in September shocked the world? That was because how could a magazine that features makeup tips and stuff ever be serious? (Unlike, say, Playboy, whose very serious, very credible political writing has long been featured alongside very serious, very credible photos of naked women).

Teen girls do a lot of cool stuff in the world.

When they're not listening to Harry Styles' music, they're writing classic novels, standing up to their elected officials on reproductive rights, and sometimes risking their lives to defy religious extremists.

A teen girl. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

Styles is insisting that we re-evaluate the musical taste of teenage girls, long mocked as immature, shallow, and frivolous, and recognize that it's actually pretty good.

More importantly, though, he's insisting that his young female fans be taken as seriously as any other person on planet Earth. And that's true and awesome.

Yay! Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images.

The rest of us should log on to InstaSnapTunes and listen to boy bands more often.

Most Shared
Instagram / JLo

The Me Too movement has shed light on just how many actresses have been placed in positions that make them feel uncomfortable. Abuse of power has been all too commonplace. Some actresses have been coerced into doing something that made them uncomfortable because they felt they couldn't say no to the director. And it's not always as flagrant as Louis C.K. masturbating in front of an up-and-coming comedian, or Harvey Weinstein forcing himself on actresses in hotel rooms.

But it's important to remember that you can always firmly put your foot down and say no. While speaking at The Hollywood Reporter's annual Actress Roundtable, Jennifer Lopez opened up about her experiences with a director who behaved inappropriately. Laura Dern, Awkwafina, Scarlett Johansson, Lupita Nyong'o, and Renee Zellweger were also at the roundtable.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture
Photo by Alfons Morales on Unsplash

Last month, the Chicago Public Library system became the largest in the country to eliminate late fees thanks to Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot.

While the move, which was implemented October 1, was intended to "remove unfair barriers to basic library access, especially for youth and low-income patrons," it had another positive outcome. Since the removal of overdue fees, along with the elimination of any outstanding charges on people's accounts, libraries across the city saw a surge in the return of overdue books over the last several weeks.

"The amount of books returned has increased by 240 percent…We're very, very happy to have that. … Those books have a value and cost money to buy. We want those assets back. We also want the patron to come back," Library Commissioner Andrea Telli said at a City Council budget hearing, the Chicago-Sun Times reports.

According to a press release from Lightfoot, late fees rarely have the impact they're intended to. "Research from other fine-free systems has indicated that fines do not increase return rates, and further that the cost of collecting and maintaining overdue fees often outweighs the revenue generated by them."

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Courtesy of Macy's

In many ways, 18-year-old Idaho native, Hank Cazier, is like any other teenager you've met. He loves chocolate, pop music, and playing games with his family. He has lofty dreams of modeling for a major clothing company one day. But one thing that sets him apart may also jeopardize his future is his recent battle against a brain tumor.

Cazier was diagnosed in 2015. When he had surgery to remove the tumor, he received trauma to his brain and lost some of his motor functionality. He's been in physical, occupational, and speech therapy ever since. The experience impacted Cazier's confidence and self-esteem, so he's been looking for a way to build himself back up again.

"I wanted to do something that helped me look forward to the future," he says.

Enter Make-A-Wish, a nonprofit organization that grants wishes for children battling critical illnesses, providing them a chance to make the impossible possible. The organization partnered with Macy's to raise awareness and help make those wishes a reality. The hope is that the "wish effect" will improve their quality of life and empower them with the strength they need to overcome these illnesses and look towards the future. That was a particularly big deal for Cazier, who had been feeling like so many of his wishes weren't going to be possible because of his critical illness.

Keep Reading Show less
Believe
True
Macy's

We all know that social media can be a cesspool of trolly negativity, but sometimes a story comes along that totally restores your faith in the whole thing. Enter the KFC proposal that started off being mocked and ended up with a swarm of support from individuals and companies who united to give the couple an experience to remember.

Facebook user Tae Spears shared the story with screenshots from Twitter, and the response has been overwhelming.

Keep Reading Show less
popular