'Tina, she's gay!': Harry Styles helped a fan come out to her mom in spectacular fashion.

Although Harry Styles is British, he's certainly an American sweetheart. The former One Direction star did something truly special for a fan during one of his concerts this July, making hearts swoon yet again.

Styles briefly interrupted his San Jose, California, concert to help a fan come out to her parents.

Grace, 18, made a double-sided poster sign for her 10th (!!!) Styles concert of the summer. The sign read, "I'm going to come out to my parents because of you!"


Styles noticed the poster and stopped the music. After asking Grace for permission, he read the poster aloud. He then asked Grace for her mother's name. (It's Tina.) Then after quieting the crowd, he shouted: "TINA, SHE'S GAY!"

At the time, Tina was in a hotel room a few miles away, but that didn't stop Styles from supporting Grace's efforts.

"Tina says she loves you," Styles told Grace in front of the packed stadium. "Congratulations. I'm very proud of you."

Grace filmed the whole thing. When she reunited with her mother at the hotel, Grace came out as bisexual and showed her mom the video. Tina's response was beautiful.

"Yes, I do love you," Tina told her daughter, "and you can be whoever you want to be."

While Styles has never "felt the need to label" his sexuality,  he has always been outspoken in his defense for LGBTQ rights.

In an interview with The Sun, Styles expressed support for Miley Cyrus's coming out as pansexual. "Being in a creative field, it’s important to be ­progressive," he reportedly said. "People doing stuff like [Cyrus] is great."

In November 2017, he made a passionate speech during a concert in Stockholm expressing his love and support for his gay and transgender fans."If you are black, if you are white, if you are gay, if you are straight, if you are transgender — whoever you are, whoever you want to be — I support you," Styles said.

While performing in another concert in Washington, D.C., Styles defiantly waved the trans flag and in Philadelphia, a "Make America Gay Again" flag.

Through his celebration of all identities, Styles is helping more people be more comfortable in their own skin. That in itself is worth applauding.

After the show, Grace tweeted her gratitude to Styles and said that his advocacy for the LGBTQ community helped her gain the courage to come out. "Thank you so much for creating an environment where I am proud to be who I am," Grace tweeted. "Your continuous support of the LGBTQ+ [community] has helped me come to love myself and feel safe."

In an interview with BuzzFeed News, Grace said she had only come out to a very few select friends before the concert. But coming out to her mother gave her a huge sense of relief. "Coming out was very liberating," Grace said. "I felt like a huge weight had been lifted off my chest. I'm very happy with who I am."

Stepping up as an affirming ally of the LGBTQ community makes a difference. Harry, thanks for spreading the love.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon