More

Finally, marriage equality is coming to Asia. These delightful pics say it all.

LGBTQ rights advocates won a major victory in Taiwan.

Finally, marriage equality is coming to Asia. These delightful pics say it all.

Taiwan is about to become the first country in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage.

On May 24, the island nation's highest court ruled that prohibiting two people from marrying based on their gender is unconstitutional.

Photo by Chiang Ying-ying/AP.


The historic decision gives Taiwan's parliament two years to either amend old laws or enact new ones to accommodate for the ruling.

The decision was met with an outpouring of tears, hugs, and cheers from LGBTQ people and their allies in Taipei.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Ying-ying/AP.

Activist Chi Chia-wei brought a request to Taiwan's highest court, challenging a provision that defined marriage as between a man and woman. Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

While the ruling was controversial — with a fair share of demonstrators protesting its potential passing in recent days — Taiwan is one of the most queer-friendly nations in the East. It boasts a large LGBTQ population and the biggest annual gay pride parade on the continent.

The decision's implications for Asia as a whole are nothing short of monumental.

In Asia, LGBTQ rights haven't progressed in the same ways or at the same speed as other regions of the world; some Asian countries are even going backward.

This week, for the first time ever, two men in Indonesia's conservative province of Aceh were caught practicing gay sex and caned 83 times each in front of a packed town square as a consequence. While most of Indonesia doesn't ban gay sex outright, Aceh adheres to Sharia.

On the same day that Taiwan's court ruled in favor of marriage equality, South Korea's military court sentenced a captain to prison for breaking its controversial "sodomy" ban — a measure Amnesty International has blasted as “a bigoted hunt to root out gay personnel.” In most Asian countries, including Japan and China, very few (if any) legislative steps have been taken to protect LGBTQ people as a marginalized minority.

Taiwan's court ruling wasn't just another inevitable step toward equality — it actively rejected the forces of a bigger regional trend chipping away at LGBTQ human rights.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

“In Asia, every country’s situation is different,” victorious activist Chi Chia-wei, who brought one of two petitions to the highest court, told the New York Times. “But this should certainly offer some encouragement to different societies to consider following in Taiwan’s footsteps and giving gays and lesbians the right to marry.”

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

Keep Reading Show less