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Evenflo's new car seat is designed to help remember the baby in the car. Here's how it works.

Some people think it could never happen to them. Others beg to differ.

Evenflo's new car seat is designed to help remember the baby in the car. Here's how it works.

Each summer, we hear more stories about babies accidentally left behind in cars.

Under the cruel heat of the summer sun, cars are like ovens.

This man demonstrated it by sitting in a parked car in the sun for 30 minutes with all four windows generously cracked.


GIF from Pet Health Network.

Last year, 31 children died from being left unattended in hot cars.

It's heartbreaking, and it's terrifying for loving parents who see how it could happen when sleep-deprived and functioning on "autopilot."

The Internet has responded with all kinds of hacks to try to save children's lives.

But if you're looking for a more advanced solution, you're in luck. There are new technologies meant to ensure a parent never forgets their child in the backseat.

Intel has a new Bluetooth product called Smart Clip that is compatible with any car seat and works with your smartphone to remind you of your precious cargo.

GIF from CNET.

The app gives you information like temperature of the car and whether it's moving, but the best feature is that when your smartphone gets a certain distance away from the clip on the carseat, you get a pop-up message and audible tone that repeats every 20 seconds until you have retrieved your child and unclipped the product. It is scheduled to be available in late 2015.

But if you need peace of mind right now, Evenflo has just released a new carseat called SensorSafe. Similarly to the plug-in device that car insurance companies use to offer a safe driving discount to customers, a small piece of hardware gets plugged into the car's onboard diagnostic system, and it communicates with the car seat. If the car seat sensor detects weight after the ignition is turned off, a musical beep sounds to alert you immediately before you exit the car.

You could hope and believe it would never happen to you. Or you can take proactive steps (product-wise or homemade hacks) to decide now and every day that it won't.

True

Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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Image via Wikicommons

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