Heroes

Evenflo's new car seat is designed to help remember the baby in the car. Here's how it works.

Some people think it could never happen to them. Others beg to differ.

Each summer, we hear more stories about babies accidentally left behind in cars.

Under the cruel heat of the summer sun, cars are like ovens.

This man demonstrated it by sitting in a parked car in the sun for 30 minutes with all four windows generously cracked.


GIF from Pet Health Network.

Last year, 31 children died from being left unattended in hot cars.

It's heartbreaking, and it's terrifying for loving parents who see how it could happen when sleep-deprived and functioning on "autopilot."

The Internet has responded with all kinds of hacks to try to save children's lives.

But if you're looking for a more advanced solution, you're in luck. There are new technologies meant to ensure a parent never forgets their child in the backseat.

Intel has a new Bluetooth product called Smart Clip that is compatible with any car seat and works with your smartphone to remind you of your precious cargo.

GIF from CNET.

The app gives you information like temperature of the car and whether it's moving, but the best feature is that when your smartphone gets a certain distance away from the clip on the carseat, you get a pop-up message and audible tone that repeats every 20 seconds until you have retrieved your child and unclipped the product. It is scheduled to be available in late 2015.

But if you need peace of mind right now, Evenflo has just released a new carseat called SensorSafe. Similarly to the plug-in device that car insurance companies use to offer a safe driving discount to customers, a small piece of hardware gets plugged into the car's onboard diagnostic system, and it communicates with the car seat. If the car seat sensor detects weight after the ignition is turned off, a musical beep sounds to alert you immediately before you exit the car.

You could hope and believe it would never happen to you. Or you can take proactive steps (product-wise or homemade hacks) to decide now and every day that it won't.

via Lady A / Twitter and Whittlz / Flickr

In one of the most glaringly hypocritical moves in recent history, the band formerly known as Lady Antebellum is suing black blues singer Anita "Lady A" White, to use her stage name she's performed under for over three decades.

Lady Antebellum announced it had changed its name to Lady A on June 11 as part of its commitment to "examining our individual and collective impact and marking the necessary changes to practice antiracism."

Antebellum refers to an era in the American south before the civil war when black people were held as slaves.

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