Evenflo's new car seat is designed to help remember the baby in the car. Here's how it works.

Some people think it could never happen to them. Others beg to differ.

Each summer, we hear more stories about babies accidentally left behind in cars.

Under the cruel heat of the summer sun, cars are like ovens.

This man demonstrated it by sitting in a parked car in the sun for 30 minutes with all four windows generously cracked.


GIF from Pet Health Network.

Last year, 31 children died from being left unattended in hot cars.

It's heartbreaking, and it's terrifying for loving parents who see how it could happen when sleep-deprived and functioning on "autopilot."

The Internet has responded with all kinds of hacks to try to save children's lives.

But if you're looking for a more advanced solution, you're in luck. There are new technologies meant to ensure a parent never forgets their child in the backseat.

Intel has a new Bluetooth product called Smart Clip that is compatible with any car seat and works with your smartphone to remind you of your precious cargo.

GIF from CNET.

The app gives you information like temperature of the car and whether it's moving, but the best feature is that when your smartphone gets a certain distance away from the clip on the carseat, you get a pop-up message and audible tone that repeats every 20 seconds until you have retrieved your child and unclipped the product. It is scheduled to be available in late 2015.

But if you need peace of mind right now, Evenflo has just released a new carseat called SensorSafe. Similarly to the plug-in device that car insurance companies use to offer a safe driving discount to customers, a small piece of hardware gets plugged into the car's onboard diagnostic system, and it communicates with the car seat. If the car seat sensor detects weight after the ignition is turned off, a musical beep sounds to alert you immediately before you exit the car.

You could hope and believe it would never happen to you. Or you can take proactive steps (product-wise or homemade hacks) to decide now and every day that it won't.

Heroes
via James Anderson

Two years ago, a tweet featuring the invoice for a fixed boiler went viral because the customer, a 91-year-old woman with leukemia, received the services for free.

"No charge for this lady under any circumstances," the invoice read. "We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible."

The repair was done by James Anderson, 52, a father-of-five from Burnley, England. "James is an absolute star, it was overwhelming to see that it cost nothing," the woman's daughter told CNN.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes

I live in a family with various food intolerances. Thankfully, none of them are super serious, but we are familiar with the challenges of finding alternatives to certain foods, constantly checking labels, and asking restaurants about their ingredients.

In our family, if someone accidentally eats something they shouldn't, it's mainly a bit of inconvenient discomfort. For those with truly life-threatening food allergies, the stakes are much higher.

I can't imagine the ongoing stress of deadly allergy, especially for parents trying to keep their little ones safe.

Keep Reading Show less
LUSH

Handmade cosmetics company Lush is putting its money where its mouth is and taking a bold step for climate change action.

On September 20 in the U.S. and September 27 in Canada, Lush will shut the doors of its 250 shops, e-commerce sites, manufacturing facilities, and headquarters for a day, in solidarity with the Global Climate Strike taking place around the world. Lush is encouraging its 5000+ employees "to join this critical movement and take a stand until global leaders are forced to face the climate crisis and enact change."

Keep Reading Show less
Planet
Photo by Annie Bolin on Unsplash

Recent tragic mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton have sparked a lot of conversation and action on the state level over the issue of gun control. But none may be as encouraging as the most recent one, in which 145 CEOs signed a letter urging the U.S. Senate to take action at their level.

Keep Reading Show less
popular