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​Detroit Youth Choir sings powerful new lyrics to Oscar-winning song 'Glory'

One day when the glory comes
It will be ours, it will be ours
Oh one day when the war is won
We will be sure, we will be sure

The song "Glory" from the feature film Selma won an Oscar in 2015. Originally performed by John Legend and Common, the song combines elements of rap, hip hop and gospel, and was a powerful anthem representing the Civil Rights Movement portrayed in the movie.

Now, that anthem has new lyrics and a young, fresh face—or rather, a bunch of young, fresh faces. The Detroit Youth Choir's rendition of "Glory" includes the original chorus, plus lyrical nods to the coronavirus pandemic and the current uprisings for racial justice. Seeing these young people singing their hearts out in a song written about a similar fight decades ago is both chilling and thought-provoking.


Members of the choir, which reached second place in last year's America's Got Talent competition, walk through the empty streets of Detroit while they sing in the video—socially distanced, of course. (The video includes a disclaimer at the beginning and the end explaining that the health of the teens was first priority in the making of the video.) The image of them singing spread out while walking over "Power to the People" painted on the street sums up so much of our current moment.

Detroit Youth Choir 'Glory' - featuring IndigoYajwww.youtube.com

People love this new version of the song, leaving comments like the following on YouTube:

"Powerful. From their lips to OUR ears. We owe these kids a better reality."

"I got chills just listening to these talented youth singing Glory. We all must work together to ensure that every American has equal and sustainable rights. We must end any pre-conceived notions about each other without knowing who people really are. The passion in this rendition of Glory is astonishing. Kudos to the Detroit Youth Choir. Keep singing!"

"Love this and will keep trying to change those minds that don't see the need to change one at a time. Please keep inspiring us to keep making change happen <3"

"This is beautiful, moving and inspiring. Bravo!!!! I live over in Basel, Switzerland now, but I was born in Detroit. May all of the beautiful, talented and courageous young people in this video continue to shine so brightly. You are already making a difference. I have goosebumps and you had me in tears. Systemic racism must finally come to an end. #Glory#WeAreOne#BlackLivesMatter#DYC#ExitRacism"

"God bless these babies. Their generation surely are going to make changes for the better."

The YouTube video also includes a fitting quote from the late civil rights leader and Congressman John Lewis: "What I try to tell young people is that if you come together with a mission, and it's grounded with love and a sense of community, you can make the impossible possible."

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What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

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