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Coldplay's Chris Martin held a super casual—and surprisingly calming—mini-concert online
Coldplay/Facebook, John Legend/Twitter

In a time when normalcy has flown out the window, we're all desperate for ways to keep calm and carry on from a socially safe distance.

Since performers have suddenly found themselves without audiences, many artists are taking to social media to touch base with fans. And the result is a remarkably human connection that art and music tend to create—especially when the performer is as delightfully unassuming and down-to-earth as Coldplay's Chris Martin.


Seriously, I like Coldplay's music, but I had no idea that Chris Martin was so freaking lovable.

From the moment he started his live video last night, I found myself calmed by Martin's infectious smile and undeniably likable personality. He spoke about all of us being part of one human family, but in a totally sincere and unpretentious way. He called out the countries represented in the comments with love and solidarity, especially hard hit areas like Italy and Iran. He played parts of songs that people requested in a raw, unfiltered performance with little mistakes and the vocal strain of the morning (it was early in the U.K.).

The whole video served as a healing balm and a sweet, authentic reminder that we're all just human beings experiencing this weird new reality together.

Using the hashtag #TogetherAtHome, Martin invited other artists to pick up where he left off and create their own live mini-concerts from home for everyone stuck in isolation. John Legend picked up the torch and will be doing a concert from home at 1pm Pacific today.

The Indigo Girls have also announced a live concert for this coming Thursday, and I'm sure more artists are lining up to keep us entertained and keep our spirits up as well.

If the world is going to go all topsy turvy, at least we have artists to help us reorient ourselves.


A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Democracy

The Onion filed a Supreme Court brief. It's both hilariously serious and seriously hilarious.

Who else could call the judiciary 'total Latin dorks' while making a legitimate point?

The Onion's Supreme Court brief uses parody to defend parody.

Political satire and parody have been around for at least 2,400 years, as ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes satirized the way Athenian leaders conducted the Peloponnesian War and parodied the dramatic styles of his contemporaries, Aeschylus and Euripides.

Satire and parody are used to poke fun and highlight issues, using mimicry and sarcasm to create comedic biting commentary. No modern outlet has been more prolific on this front than The Onion, and the popular satirical news site is defending parody as a vital free speech issue in a legal filing with the U.S. Supreme Court.

The filing is, as one might expect from The Onion, as brilliantly hilarious as it is serious, using the same satirical style it's defending in the crafting of the brief itself.

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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