Check out Time magazine's Person of the Year cover: 'The Silence Breakers.'

On Wednesday, Dec. 6, Time magazine revealed its Person of the Year.

Toward the end of each year, the distinction draws curiosity and intrigue for weeks, but 2017 maybe brought on more speculation than usual. On Nov. 24, Trump falsely claimed he turned down the possibility of becoming the Person of the Year on Twitter, fueling speculation about who'd receive the honor.

Photo by Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images.


This year, like in other years before, the "person" of the year was actually a whole group of people.

Time's Person of the Year went to "The Silence Breakers: The Voices that Launched a Movement."

Ashley Judd, Susan Fowler, Adama Iwu, Taylor Swift, and Isabel Pascual — all survivors who bravely came forward about their experiences with sexual harassment or assault, often at the hands of powerful abusers — grace the cover.

But Time isn't solely acknowledging its cover models; a long list of other notable names has been included in the magazine's Person of the Year feature.

Names like Rose McGowan, Lindsey Meyer, Lindsey Reynolds...

GIF via Time magazine/Twitter.

Sandra Muller, Sandra Pezqueda, and Megyn Kelly...

GIF via Time magazine/Twitter.

And many others, including noteworthy men who've come forward, actor Terry Crews and Blaise Godbe Lipman.

2017 marked a watershed year for survivors of sexual abuse.

"All social movements have highly visible precipitating factors," Aldon Morris, a professor of sociology at Northwestern University, told Time. "In this case, you had Harvey Weinstein, and before that you had Trump."

In the past year and a half, 13 women have come forward alleging Trump sexually harassed or assaulted them following the infamous 2005 "Access Hollywood" tape, in which the former reality TV star admitted to groping women. Movie mogul Harvey Weinstein — an abuser identified by multiple Person of the Year recipients — used a media network of enablers and case settlements to silence dozens of victims for decades.

Out of the rubble of so many disgraced, powerful men burst the #MeToo movement — an online wave of survivors speaking out in solidarity. First coined by activist Tarana Burke years ago but given new life on Twitter by actor Alyssa Milano, #MeToo has been used online millions of times in at least 85 countries.

It's a rallying cry that's not going away.

"There's something really empowering about standing up for what's right," said Fowler, who took on sexual harassment in tech. "It's a badge of honor."

Read more on Time's 2017 Person of the Year feature.

Most Shared
Vaping 360

A young doctor has taken to TikTok, the new social media app popular among Gen. Z, to share information about important health issues, including the negative side effects of vaping.

Dr. Rose Marie Leslie, 29, is a second-year family resident at the University of Minnesota Physicians Broadway Family Medicine Clinic.

When she first joined the platform six months ago, she initially started sharing videos about her hectic life as a resident. But whenever she'd share videos with medical facts, she noticed more comments and likes.


Dr. Leslie on TikTok www.tiktok.com


Keep Reading Show less
popular

There's nothing like a good reunion story to get you misty in the ol' tear ducts. Kate Howard, the managing editor of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting, shared a story of randomly running into the dog she used to foster on Twitter. You know all those dog reunion movies? The ones with names like A Dog's Hope and A Dog's Sloppy Kiss? The ones that make you cry buckets no matter how hard you think your heart is? Well, this is that, but in real life.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

The great thing about American democracy is the separation of powers. The federal government has rights, states have rights, counties have rights, cities have rights, and we, as people, have rights, too.

Heck, even animals have some rights in the good ol' U S of A.

The president of the United States is not a king or a dictator so a team of U.S. mayors, led by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, are asking to go over his head to negotiate directly at next month's UN climate change conference in Santiago, Chile.

Keep Reading Show less
popular