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The CDC says 6% of COVID deaths are only from COVID. Doctors explain what that really means.

As seemingly happens every week during the pandemic, misinformation has been floating around about some statistics the CDC shared on its website. This time, it stems from a now-removed tweet that President Trump retweeted from a QAnon follower (yup), which claims that the CDC "quietly" added some data to their website to clarify that only 6% of COVID-19 deaths were a result of COVID alone, whereas 94% of them included other "serious illnesses" as causes of death.

The tweet used this statistic to make it seem that COVID had really only killed around 9,000 people. That's not at all what it means.

First of all here's what the CDC website actually states: "For 6% of the deaths, COVID-19 was the only cause mentioned. For deaths with conditions or causes in addition to COVID-19, on average, there were 2.6 additional conditions or causes per death."

Many experts have weighed in on the confusion to set the record straight.


Dr. Zubin Damania is a hospitalist (a dedicated in-patient physician who works exclusively in a hospital) who also has his own show where he discusses all things medical. One of his hallmarks is trying to separate politics from medical fact, which theoretically should make him a refreshing source no matter where you land on the political spectrum.

He explains in a video how death certificates are filled out and why "additional conditions or causes" doesn't in any way negate a death from COVID-19. Basically, this data doesn't tell us anything we didn't already know, but the political spin to make it sound like this information is some kind of bombshell is simply not sound science.

As Dr. Damania points out, you can make all the arguments against lockdowns or express your opinion that the economic sacrifices don't outweigh the cost in lives or whatever without misrepresenting the science and the facts.

That CDC 6% COVID Death Rate, Explainedwww.youtube.com

If you prefer to read a news article about why the 6% statistic doesn't mean what some people are saying it means, here's a thorough article that explains the whole thing.

If you prefer the brevity of a TikTok, here you go:

@dr.noc BEWARE the armchair epidemiologists and their misguided theories. ##covid19##science##coronavirus##medicine##nursing##outrage
♬ original sound - dr.noc

Here's a Facebook post from an epidemiologist:

And how about a Twitter thread from an oncologist and editor of a cancer journal, who surely knows a thing or two about death statistics? He summed it up perhaps more succinctly than anyone.

"600,000 die of cancer each year. 95% likely have comorbidities. Doesn't mean cancer was not the cause of their death."

Bottom line, COVID-19 has killed more than 180,000 Americans. Just like with every other death from disease, other comorbidities are listed on death certificates. You can look at the WHO instructions for how to list causes of death with COVID-19 here. (Scroll down to page 3 to see a death certificate filled out correctly, in which COVID-19 led to acute respiratory distress and pneumonia, and how all three are listed.) Nothing about these stats is new or shocking information.

Wear your mask, keep your distance, wash your hands, and carry on.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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