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Pets

Guy shows the quick escalation of deciding to get a cat. It almost never stops at just one

“You can’t have an odd number of cats, it’s the law.”

cats; cat distribution system; cat videos; funny animal videos; cat tiktok

Guy walks through the quick escalation of deciding to get a cat

When you adopt a cat or more likely, a cat adopts you, something strange happens. You develop this tiny little voice that tells you things only cat owners understand. "You need another cat." Does this voice actually exist? Well, you can't rule anything out because cats have a funny way of worming into your heart and dictating things without ever actually speaking.

They tell you when its time for dinner, when you need to open the door and even when you forgot to scoop their litter boxes. Cats are stealthy little bosses that have highly underpaid human assistants. But for some reason people love cats and listen to the little voice that tells them that one just isn't enough.

One guy with the username Kylokilalayuumi documented his journey to four cats in an adorably cute 20 second video uploaded to TikTok that currently has more than 4 million views.


The video starts with a tiny stripped kitten looking out the car window as the man drives it home before immediately heading into the next clip of a back cat playing. To be completely fair, the tabby cat probably talked him into it using the most effective method available to kittens, excessive playing with the inability to control their claws. Having one kitten is usually just the bridge to adopting another to keep it occupied and from clawing its way to the top of your head.

"Ok, I'm just going to get one, alright, it's just one alright, how bad could one be? It's not that expensive, it's not...well, I have to get it a friend, right? I mean who's he going to talk to? He's going to get bored," The man says in the voice over. "And you know what if they get sick of each other, you know, they need a third guy and honestly, I have three. I might as well get the whole set."

Other cat lovers knew the cat system very well and commented on the video letting the man know.

“You can’t have an odd number of cats, it’s the law," one person said.

"It’s like chips, you can’t have just one," another wrote.

"Yeahhhh this is how I ended up with 7 cats in a 2 month span," someone else revealed.

Clearly, owning one cat makes you extremely susceptible to owning a glaring of them, which the name is fitting because if you've ever met a cat you know they have the glare down to a science.

Watch the quick escalation below:

@kylokilalayuumi

the story of how i ended up with 4 cats #fyp #fypシ #foryou #catsoftiktok #cutecat #cats #catvideos #kittensoftiktok #ragdollkitten #ragdoll #voidcat #scottishfold #scottishfoldcat #kitten

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