Britney Spears shared a moving post on Instagram in response to mocking her appearance

According to the Pew Research Center, four in ten Americans have received some form of online harassment, and 75% of Americans have seen some kind of cyberbullying going on. Two-thirds of people who experienced online harassment said that they experienced name calling. Instagram has been making changes to turn the platform into a safer space, such as AI that flags posts that might be offensive. When someone writes a mean comment, the user is asked, "Are you sure you want to post this?" then directed to Instagram's policy on bullying and offensive content.


Even though Instagram is aware of the problem and working to fix it, it's still way too easy to dash off a mean comment. Even Britney Spears thinks online bullying goes too far. Spears recently posted an Instagram video of her Holiday decorations with a caption politely asking Instagram users to be nice when they post.

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"Happy holidays friends !!!! I love sharing with you all ... but it's been hard to keep wanting to share because people say the meanest things !!!" the singer wrote on Instagram. The post comes after Spears received a slew of mean responses for posting herself wearing a sundress in December. Some users piled on her makeup, saying it made them think of "Halloween." Others commented on how it made her "look older."



Spears told people what they should do if they don't like a post, because it seems like a lot of people haven't figured it out by now. "If you don't like a post ... just keep it to yourself and unfollow that person !!! There's no reason to ever go out of your way to make mean comments and bully people," she wrote.

She rounded out her post with a nice Holiday message. "Stay happy and nice this holiday season y'all and God Bless !!!!!" she concluded.

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Spears' boyfriend, Sam Asghari, echoed the singer's sentiments. "It's so easy to cyber attack and hide behind their phones and write mean comments, but when they run into you in real life all of the sudden they act like they have been such a huge fan and want a picture. #hatersplease," he commented on Spears' post.

Spears' Instagram account has been lauded for being unique, quirky, and the right kind of random (yes, she does her own posts), but apparently, not everyone appreciates the national treasure that is Britney Spears. And those people should just keep it to themselves.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

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When the Soviet Union invaded Lithuania in June of 1940, scores of Jews flooded the Japanese consulate, seeking transit visas to be able to escape to a safety through Japan. Overwhelmed by the requests, Sugihara reached out to the foreign ministry in Tokyo for guidance and was told that no one without proper paperwork should be issued a visa—a limitation that would have ruled out nearly all of the refugees seeking his help.

Sugihara faced a life-changing choice. He could obey the government and leave the Jews in Lithuania to their fate, or he could disobey orders and face disgrace and the loss of his job, if not more severe punishments from his superiors.

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Sugihara was fond of saying, "I may have to disobey my government, but if I don't, I would be disobeying God." Sugihara decided it was worth it to risk his livelihood and good standing with the Japanese government to give the Jews at his doorstep a fighting chance, so he started issuing Japanese transit visas to any refugee who needed one, regardless of their eligibility.

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