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Baby Blankets Are Nice — Just Don’t Put Them On Your Baby

Having a baby is life-changing, but most folks know that taking care of them is no cakewalk.

Yep, there are plenty of priceless moments, but new parenthood is also bizarre, messy, and incredibly scary. Putting a baby to bed can be one of those incredibly scary moments. Thankfully, I found it a lot less frightening after watching this.


Just to recap…

What's SIDS?

SIDS, or sudden infant death syndrome, is "a sudden death in an infant under 1 year old that cannot be explained after a thorough investigation is conducted. An investigation includes an autopsy, an examination of the death scene, and a review of the infant's medical history."

What are we doing wrong?

"Nearly 50% of American infants sleep with unsafe bedding that can increase the risk of SIDS."

What's unsafe bedding?

"Loose blankets, toys in the crib, pillows, and quilts" all increase the risk of SIDS and accidental suffocation.

So, what's safe?

According to the National Institutes of Health, the best way to rock-a-bye baby to sleep is to put them on their back on a "firm, safety-approved mattress with a fitted sheet. That's it! No extra bedding, no unmonitored swaddling, no baby toys, nothing on top of or under the baby."

To keep the baby warm, dress them in layers for bed so you can add or remove clothing as needed. Keep the room at a comfortable temperature.

There are also these cute sleep sacks. "They're like dresses, with the bottoms sewn closed so it mimics the sensation of being swaddled or the blanket but doesn't pose a risk of suffocation."

And remember...

Contrary to popular belief, babies don't need any more warming or bundling than adults.

via LeapsMag / Instagram

Researchers at the University of Houston have developed a filtration system that can instantly neutralize and kill 99.8% of the coronavirus after a single pass through.

"It's basically a high-performance COVID-19 killer," Dr. Garrett Peel of Medistar, who helped craft the design, said according to Fox News.

The filter looks to be an important tool in fighting a virus that can remain in the air for hours and, in turn, spread more readily than viruses like the common flu. Harvard Health says that aerosolized coronavirus can remain in the air for up to three hours.

People who are asymptomatic can easily spread it to multiple people when they talk, breathe, cough, or sneeze.

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