More

Allow this post to make you happy. With science.

Allow this post to make you happy. With science.

Allow this post to make you happy. With science.

Good day, folks!

Watch this really smart dude Jason Silva, in this Big Think video, tell you about why you should strive to be happy:


<span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>

He knows his stuff, doesn't he?

But, if you're like me, it takes a moment to digest all that he was saying. Let me pull out a couple of points and try and clarify them for you.

First, a little music, to help you get in that happy frame of mind:

"By curating circumstance, we have the ability to co-author our experience."

"Curating circumstance" means to literally pick and choose the stuff in your life that will make you happy.



Personal story time! As I have mentioned in other writing, my family is very religious, and I am very gay. In this instance, those things don't mix too well, but after college, I lived at home for six years. That was pretty unhappy for everyone involved, as much as I love my family.

It was only when I decided to strike out on my own and move to the place I had been dreaming about living since I was in high school (New York City) that my happiness really started to fall in place.

"The intention to be optimistic makes me stumble upon all these things that make me feel more optimistic. ... There's always going to be the wild card."

"The intention to be optimistic" essentially means that we all need to actively try to be happy, even when it seems hard. And sometimes, it is hard.

Let's say it's a beautiful summer day, and I just got a caramel gelato cone. I'm walking down the street where I live in New York, and I trip, sending my beautiful ice cream cone tumbling onto the hot pavement below.

That would suck.

But! If I let that decide my happiness for the rest of the day, I might miss out on so many other happy things. Maybe, in my gelato-related sadness, I don't notice a friend across the street trying to get my attention. And maybe that friend just so happens to have a gallon of that same caramel gelato ready to share.

Essentially, try to smile more. You might find yourself in a happier place.


There are so many things that can ruin our mood. But there are also so many things that can make us happy as well. The trick is to concentrate on the good things while dealing with the sad. It truly is the key to happiness.

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less
via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

In Ward's "Alt Disney" series, Prince Charming and Pinocchio have fallen victim to smart phone addiction. Ariel is living in a polluted ocean, and Simba and Baloo have been abused by humans.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

With many schools going virtual, many daycare facilities being closed or limited, and millions of parents working from home during the pandemic, the balance working moms have always struggled to achieve has become even more challenging in 2020. Though there are more women in the workforce than ever, women still take on the lion's share of household and childcare duties. Moms also tend to bear the mental load of keeping track of all the little details that keep family life running smoothly, from noticing when kids are outgrowing their clothing to keeping track of doctor and dentist appointments to organizing kids' extracurricular activities.

It's a lot. And it's a lot more now that we're also dealing with the daily existential dread of a global pandemic, social unrest, political upheaval, and increasingly intense natural disasters.

That's why scientist Gretchen Goldman's refreshingly honest photo showing where and how she conducted a CNN interview is resonating with so many.

Keep Reading Show less

Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less